gubernatorial election

Kitzhaber Keeps Pressing Health Care Reforms

Governor Kitzhaber and Kaiser CEO Bernard Tyson agree the health care business model is broken and one major reason why is the separation of care for physical and mental illnesses.

Appearing together at the Portland Business Alliance's annual breakfast, Kitzhaber and Tyson stressed the need to move from a "volume-driven" approach to a model that offers better care at more affordable prices.

The Portland Business Journal quoted Tyson as saying, "There is a mental health challenge we're working on, how to reattach the head to the body." Tyson said physical and mental illness is treated in separate locations, using separate records, even though 45 percent of physical health visits indicate a need for mental health services.

Tyson also said fee-for-service medicine needs to be "thrown out the window."

Kitzhaber touted the benefits being achieved through coordinated care organizations, which he credited for shrinking annual cost increases in care from 5.4 percent to 3.4 percent. The governor noted the 16 current CCOs care for 900,000 lower income Oregonians and are engaged in integrating physical, mental and dental care. He said he next wants to expand CCO cover to public employees and teachers and ultimately to the entire health insurance market.

Political Pot Continues to Boil

The September 15 deadline is creeping up for Governor Kitzhaber to decide whether to move forward with a legislative special session to consider further cuts to public employee pensions, business tax cuts and an Oregon-led approach to building a replacement I-5 Columbia River bridge.

The path to all three is littered with political obstacles. One thing is clear, however. If there is a special session, it will be by September 30, the date that Oregon's offer expires to share the state costs on the bridge with Washington.

The Kitzhaber camp isn't saying whether he has lined up the votes for the grand bargain or bridge funding. The pieces may not fall into place – or fall apart – until Treasurer Ted Wheeler releases his financial analysis of the risks involved in Oregon leading the way on replacing the Columbia River bridge. When the Oregon-in-the-lead strategy was unveiled last month, Wheeler questioned whether there was enough time for an analysis before a special session would be called. Now he has until September 15.

Bridge financing is not a new subject for Wheeler, the former Multnomah County chair who pieced together the bucks to replace the aging Sellwood Bridge, which is now under construction. But the timing of the Columbia River bridge financial analysis couldn't have occurred at a stickier time for Wheeler, who might be the odds-on favorite to succeed Kitzhaber as governor if he decides not to seek re-election.

As it turns out, Kitzhaber is fundraising, presumably for his yet-to-be-announced 2014 gubernatorial re-election campaign. The three-term governor also showed his political flag at a Labor Day union function, declaring firm opposition to an initiative that would ban mandatory payments by public employees to public unions. The Oregonian speculated his comments – which caused Oregon AFL-CIO President Tom Chamberlain to quip: 'Damn, Governor, you sounded like the president of the AFL-CIO" – were aimed at politically defusing political opposition caused by his continued support for deeper cuts in public employee pensions.