issues management

Pinterest Idea Boards Offer Distinctive Platform for Thought Leadership

Yes, Pinterest boards are filled with recipes, travel destinations and cool photographs, but they also can be used for thought leadership such as curating the insights and bright ideas from a major conference or extended event.

Yes, Pinterest boards are filled with recipes, travel destinations and cool photographs, but they also can be used for thought leadership such as curating the insights and bright ideas from a major conference or extended event.

Have you ever attended a conference, speech or major event and wished you could share the nuggets of wisdom you gained? Pinterest has an idea for you.

Actually, Pinterest has an idea board for you.

Sporting events or unfolding election results lend themselves to a series of tweets. A single aha moment from a speech can form a solid foundation for a blog post. A funny episode or clever display makes for a popular Facebook or Instagram post. But Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and blogs aren’t as accommodating to a group of insights.

Jessica Lawlor, writing for ragan.com, points out that most Pinterest users aren’t there to interact with friends and families. They are looking for ideas and tips. Recipes, travel destinations and cool photographs are common, but any kind of content with a long shelf life works well.

Pinterest can provide a visual scrapbook for ideas gathered at a conference or extended event. The idea board can serve as a handy reference tool both for the person pinning as well as for their followers and event sponsors. The idea board, with a wide range of interesting notes in the form of pins, can become a useful tactic in demonstrating thought leadership.

Since note-taking is a modern-day lost art, curating the high points and breath-through moments from events or conferences can be a real value. Pinterest’s board concept is a perfect platform for this kind of content.

In fact, Pinterest has improved its suitability for this kind of content with what it calls group boards, which allow others to add their pins, enriching the overall value of the content and enticing more followers. You also can pin media coverage of the event. Group boards work best with engagement, so it is smart to promote the group board, starting with other conference or event attendees and extending to your associates with an interest in the subject matter.

Another value of Pinterest is its visual orientation. With photos, videos and graphs, Pinterest is great for showing what you mean, which can transform dry conference presentations into lively, visually appealing content.

Pinterest is measurably different than other leading social media platforms, but some of the same rules apply. Original, relevant content counts. Keywords matter. Engagement, through repining and following, is king. Your Pinterest boards need to fit into a thoughtful strategy and connect with your website.

With that in mind, idea boards can be a distinctive way for you to exercise your thought leadership, even for the menial task of taking notes to capture someone else’s bright ideas.

 

Take a Break and Consume Some Hopeful News

If you are discouraged by the continuous torrent of bad news, check out stories written from the perspective of solutions journalism. They can be informative and inspirational, restoring some semblance of hope that serious social problems are being addressed and conquered.

If you are discouraged by the continuous torrent of bad news, check out stories written from the perspective of solutions journalism. They can be informative and inspirational, restoring some semblance of hope that serious social problems are being addressed and conquered.

What people believe is largely determined by the information they consume.

People are bombarded with a wide range of information on TV, the internet and grocery checkout aisles. They also receive information from friends, coworkers and the clergy.

The blizzard of information we experience seems oddly inconsistent with proclamations we now live in a post-truth era, increasingly influenced by fake news – and claims of fake news. In the past, we had differing points of view; now we face a fundamental disagreement on basic facts – from the size of a crowd to signs of perilous climate change.

This state of affairs has led many in the news media to reflect on their performance. Have media outlets surrendered objectivity to reinforcing partisan perspectives? Are ratings and clicks driving news agendas? Will shrunken news staffs focus on “breaking news” at the expense of more time-consuming trend stories and investigative reports?

Allison Frost, a senior producer for Oregon Public Broadcasting, has asked an even more probing question – is there a role for journalists to point out solutions to serious and often chronic problems? In her piece posted on Medium and titled, “I practice solutions journalism,” Frost says the answer is yes.

I practice solutions journalism because: Our job as journalists is to cover what’s happening in the world, and we are largely only covering the things that are falling apart, broken, murderous, horrific,” Frost writes. “Those things are true, they are. But there are other things that are also true.”

Those ‘other things’ include covering “the people who are envisioning and contributing to solving problems.” “We’re socially and biologically programmed to attend to problems, but we need to attend to the responses to those problems in order to solve these problems – as community, as a state, a country, a planet,” according to Frost.

The news media, Frost believes, can help by telling the stories of problem-solvers. “If we don’t cover what’s possible, the alternatives and responses to the daily conflict, death and destruction, who will?”

Stories about problem-solvers and solutions can at once be informative and inspirational. They can be an antidote to alienation and frustration. They can be a respite from an unremitting series of stories about mass shootings, public corruption and persistent poverty. “I do not kid myself,” Frost admits, “that the problems will all go away and there will be no more problems or conflicts to cover.”

As pessimism feeds on itself, so does hope. Solutions journalism is one way the news media can break out of its cycle of bad news and publish stories that fuel some optimism.

Frost included in her post a link to the Solutions Story Tracker™, which features almost 3,400 solutions journalism stories reporting on responses to social problems. They were produced by more than 600 separate news outlets from 135 countries. The database continues to grow. If you despair from all that bad news, check out the Story Tracker and realize there are people trying to make things better.