health care

A Peek at American Pride Before Independence Day

As Americans prepare to celebrate Independence Day, a new Gallup poll reveals a continuing decline in national pride that reflects polarized political views, discontent with US welfare and health care systems and deep disappointment in the US political system.

As Americans prepare to celebrate Independence Day, a new Gallup poll reveals a continuing decline in national pride that reflects polarized political views, discontent with US welfare and health care systems and deep disappointment in the US political system.

American overall pride in their country has dipped to the lowest point since Gallup started asking the poll question in 2001. Democrats are mostly responsible for the decline in pride.

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“Record-low American patriotism is the latest casualty of the sharply polarized political climate in the U.S. today,” Gallup said of its poll conducted in June. “For the second time in 19 years, fewer than half of U.S. adults say they are extremely proud to be Americans. The decline reflects plummeting pride among Democrats since Trump took office, even as Republican pride has edged higher.” 

Before jumping to a conclusion about who is and isn’t patriotic, Gallup asked revealing questions that help to pinpoint the decline in pride:

  • 91% of Americans take pride in American scientific achievements.

  • 89% are proud of the US military.

  • 85% are proud of American culture and arts.

  • 75% are proud of American economic achievements.

  • 73% are proud of American sporting achievements.

  • 72% are proud of US diversity in race, ethnic background and religion.

America is off track on its health, welfare and political systems.

  • Only 37% of Americans take pride in US health and welfare system.

  • Only 32% take pride in the American political system.

There is an unmistakable division between Republicans, Democrats and Independents and a noticeable difference between older and younger adults.

  • 76% of Republicans are extremely proud of America contrasted to only 41% of Independents and 22% of Democrats.

  • 63% of adults 65 or older are extremely proud of America compared to 24% of adults between the ages of 18-29.

Gallup said the highest expressions of pride in country occurred immediately after the 9/11 terror attack in New York.

Poll Confirms Voter Interest Surging for Midterm Election

Democrats predict a blue wave and Republicans sense a surge in support after the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation. They both could be right and the nation could be in for a blockbuster night of tight election results. [Illustration by Zac Freeland/Vox]

Democrats predict a blue wave and Republicans sense a surge in support after the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation. They both could be right and the nation could be in for a blockbuster night of tight election results. [Illustration by Zac Freeland/Vox]

Democrats predict a blue wave in the looming midterm elections and Republicans point to a GOP surge following the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. They both could be right.

A Washington Post-ABC News poll released over the weekend shows overall enthusiasm for voting this November is markedly higher (12 percent) than it was in October 2014, the last midterm election.

The two largest leaps in enthusiasm from four years ago are among younger (25 percent) and nonwhite (24 percent) voters. Enthusiasm among Democrats jumped 18 percent, independents 13 percent and Republicans 4 percent.

There are fascinating statistics within statistics. The Kavanaugh confirmation battle increased Republican voter resolve this fall, especially among males. President Donald Trump’s approval rating also bumped up. However, a significant gender gap remains. According to the poll, women favor Democratic House candidates by a 59 to 37 percent margin, driven in part by an even greater split among women who identify as political independents (62 to 37 percent).

A striking, though not surprising finding is that partisans on both sides seem to be hardening their positions. Ninety percent of voters who disapprove of Trump are supporting Democratic candidates and 87 percent who approve of Trump are voting for Republicans.

Partisans do agree that the upcoming election is more important than previous midterms. Democrats are more convinced at 74 percent, but 61 percent of Republicans agree.

On issues, poll respondents expressed slightly more trust in Republicans over Democrats in managing the economy (45 to 41 percent), while showing about the same level of trust in Democrats over Republicans on taxes (45 to 42 percent). Democrats hold double-digit leads over Republicans on changing the way Washington works, appointment of Supreme Court justices, immigration and equal treatment of men and women. According to poll results, the economy and health care rank as the top issues.

The poll was conducted last week using a random sample of 1,144 adults, 65 percent reached via cell phones and 35 percent on landline telephones. Reaching voters by cell phone is a major change in the way telephone surveys are conducted to ensure representative inclusion of younger, poorer and minority respondents.

 

Health Care Embraces Panel Research

Hospitals and health systems are embracing new ways to improve patient engagement and communication by using panel-based research techniques.

The way people communicate is changing rapidly. Almost all households have access to the Internet. Smartphone and tablet use is widespread. Patients want to communicate with service organizations they trust and they want to do it at times that are convenient for them. Panel research allows this to happen.

Panel research uses web-based research tools. Customers are invited by email to participate in online surveys. Participants are asked if they want to continue to participate in future research. Typically, 60 to 70 percent say yes. This group forms the panel for future research.

Health Care Reform Opposed by a Majority of Decision-Makers in Oregon

The debate about health care reform has calmed but decision makers in Oregon say reform will have a negative impact on the country, on their company or organization, and on the cost and quality of health care.

These are key findings in a recent CFM/Oregon Business INPUT survey among 923 decision makers.

Health care reform was unpopular among Oregon business decision makers who opposed the reform plan by nearly a two to one margin, 31 percent favor to 57 percent opposed.

Opposition was based on several factors.

It was widely perceived, national health care reform was poor public policy.

Facebook and Research: Match Made Through Social Media

Understanding Facebook’s advertising tools enables companies to conduct research among the difficult to reach 18-to-29 year old demographic group.

Recently a client wanted CFM to conduct focus groups among young adults in the Portland, Oregon area. Usually this means randomly calling hundreds of phone numbers and asking screening questions to find 12 persons to participate. It is costly and time consuming. But for young adults, it is even more difficult because nearly half don’t have landlines.