owning a mistake

Own Your Errors and Hit Homeruns with Your Mature Example

Yankees outfielder Clint Frazier is a dynamic young talent, but against the Boston Red Sox over the weekend he had a dreadful game on defense, contributing five runs to the visiting team. After the game, Frazier refused to talk with the media, damaging his own reputation, undermining his own self-esteem and clashing with the Yankee clubhouse tradition of owning mistakes as self-motivation and setting an example for others.

Yankees outfielder Clint Frazier is a dynamic young talent, but against the Boston Red Sox over the weekend he had a dreadful game on defense, contributing five runs to the visiting team. After the game, Frazier refused to talk with the media, damaging his own reputation, undermining his own self-esteem and clashing with the Yankee clubhouse tradition of owning mistakes as self-motivation and setting an example for others.

Owning failure isn’t easy. Avoiding responsibility can be worse than failure. Clint Frazier of the New York Yankees is the latest case example.

Frazier had a nightmare game over the weekend against the Boston Red Sox. His unraveling play in right field led to five Boson runs over two innings, sealing a win for the visiting nemesis of the hometown Yankees. That’s bad enough. Then Frazier refused to talk to the press and acknowledge his flubs. 

His on-field meltdowns – he played defense like his shoelaces were tied together – cost the Yankees a game. His childish refusal to face the press after the loss damaged his reputation in the clubhouse and with fans. 

Frazier is a 24-year-old star-in-the-making. He is tenacious and talented. He also is immature and that immaturity could stunt his career.

As a baseball player myself as a youth and later as an adult, I can tell you failure is part of the game. You flub a grounder. You strike out with the bases loaded. You run the team out of a rally. You are humiliated. You want to lock yourself into the porta-potty and hold your breath until everyone leaves the ballfield. 

But life is like baseball. There is another game another day. You have another chance to be the hero instead of the goat. Redemption is just one clean single up the middle away.

The key takeaway from Frazier’s clubhouse hibernation is that failure on the field can be conquered by courage off the field. Facing the music, owning the stink and redoubling the effort are heroic ways to cope – and to inspire others to find a path forward from their failure.

In crisis communications, we tend to overlook, to underestimate the impact of denial on those watching what has unfolded. Owning a mistake isn’t just self-redeeming; it is redemptive for those watching. Owning a mistake is an example for others to follow when they fail or fall down.

Refusing to own a mistake not only tarnishes your own reputation, it also puts a stain on your colleagues, your company and your followers. They are diminished in the same way you are when you hide from failure. 

Frazier defended his no-show appearance as a natural reluctance to address his lack of defensive prowess in public. Hello, Frazier is a professional baseball player, somebody who plays a game for pay in front of thousands of fans. Fans who expect some level of accountability. Fans who hope players will be great, but for whom they don’t expect perfection.

The problem with Frazier’s attitude is that it undersells his own resiliency, his own talent and his own will to succeed. Worse, it undervalues the example he could set – to be human, to be humble, to be forgiving of himself. People screw up all the time. They need to see and be inspired by other people who have the courage to be larger than their screw-ups.

The impact of owning your own failure is therapeutic, not only for you, but also for the people around you, especially the people who root for and look up to you. Owning a failure is not only a sign of maturity, it is a badge of leadership. You tell those around you it’s okay to fail, but it’s not okay to deny it, walk away from it or prevent you from pursuing success.

Failure is not the end of the road. It often is just the road sign to another route to success. Failure is just part of life’s journey. You help everyone find their path by admitting you lost track of yours.

[Conkling is a lifelong, die-hard Yankees fan – and a fan of Clint Frazier.]

Gary Conkling Image.jpg

Gary Conkling is principal and co-founder of CFM Strategic Communications, and he leads the firm's PR practice, specializing in crisis communications. He is a former journalist, who later worked on Capitol Hill and represented a major Oregon company. But most importantly, he’s a die-hard Ducks fan. You can reach Gary at garyc@cfmpdx.com and you can follow him on Twitter at @GaryConkling.

 

 

Protecting a Reputation and the Walk to Redemption

Taylor Swift’s aptly named new album “Reputation” offers insight into how to respond when you do something bad.

Taylor Swift’s aptly named new album “Reputation” offers insight into how to respond when you do something bad.

Most people concerned about their reputation don’t follow Taylor Swift’s example and write songs with titles like “I Did Something Bad.” Instead, most people try to figure out how to scrub social media sites and influence Google searches.

Whitewashing an online reputation has both physical and ethical limitations. Addressing a reputational issue head-on has a more durable and dependable life cycle. You are basically telling your own story, as Ms. Swift has done on her latest studio album titled, appropriately, “Reputation.”

Facing a rumor, allegation or documented exposé may be uncomfortable, but could be more rewarding than wishing the comments and innuendos would go away, which they won’t, even under an online pile of “good” news. A healthier and more reputation-friendly approach is to take charge of your own story.

This is a case of when a bold offense is the best defense. You can let a story drip you to death through court filings or information leaks. Or you can disrupt your opposition’s narrative with proactive communication.

Going on offense doesn’t mean throwing caution to the wind. Bold offense is a strategic, not impulsive move that requires careful coordination with legal, financial or other key advisers. You may have to admit where you were wrong, insensitive, negligent or slow to act. 

Owning your mistake could be a small price to pay to earn the chance to tell your side of the story, earn some credibility and preserve a reputation. The admissions you make may be ones that you will make sooner or later in court or in a regulatory settlement. Waiting does little for your credibility and may further tarnish your reputation.

Telling your story doesn’t get you off the hook. But it will affect the arc of the conversation. You may introduce new facts or perspectives. Your admission may disarm critics. You may recommend something that takes the wind out of the sails of opponents. What’s important is that you make the conversation change course.

Reputation management isn’t a science or, for that matter, an art. Reputation management involves a candid analysis of a situation and identifying a proactive response. In an increasingly cynical and polarized world, protecting your reputation may take a really bold move.

Predictable or expected responses may tone down chirping, but not stop it. Hiding behind old, stale arguments – however justified those arguments may be – just perpetuates the critical chirping you want to escape. Ignoring the chirping is like throwing your hands up in the air. Trying to drown it out with louder chirping is like throwing a Hail Mary pass.

Protecting your reputation takes more than wearing a bullet-proof vest or trying to wave a wand to make bad news go poof. It usually requires a savvy, bold move that seizes the narrative from critics or pundits. Or as Ms. Swift expressed it in her song:

They never see it comin'
What I do next
This is how the world works

Reputations are precious, vulnerable things. People judge, but they also forgive. What they are less likely to do is forget a cover-up or a snow job.

When you do something bad, look for a path to redemption, not a secret passageway. Walking the path of redemption could be the best exercise for your reputation.