Thought Leadership

New Ad Campaign Example of Showmanship

Excedrin’s latest ad campaign uses virtual reality to show how painful and debilitating migraine headaches can be and why those who suffer them aren’t faking it.

Excedrin’s latest ad campaign uses virtual reality to show how painful and debilitating migraine headaches can be and why those who suffer them aren’t faking it.

A new Excedrin ad campaign addresses the common view that people exaggerate the pain from migraine headaches by replicating the experience through virtual reality. It is a great example of communication showmanship. 

Stung by criticism that a previous ad campaign trivialized migraine headache pain, Excedrin created the "Migraine Experience" which replicates the auras, disorientation, bright lights, floating spots and tunnel vision suffered by people with migraine headaches.

The pain killer company plans to make the migraine simulator available as a downloadable app, which can be experienced using Google Cardboard.

A scene from the new Excedrin ad shows a glimpse of how the world might look through the eyes of someone in the midst of a migraine. 

A scene from the new Excedrin ad shows a glimpse of how the world might look through the eyes of someone in the midst of a migraine. 

In one new TV ad, the mother of a young woman afflicted by migraines dons a virtual reality headset and is able to “see” her contorted world. She reacts emotionally, hugging her daughter with newfound empathy for the pain her daughter suffers from migraines.

The ad campaign is less about selling Excedrin than persuading people the anguish of migraines is real, excruciating and debilitating, often going beyond severe headaches to include nausea, dizziness and heightened sensitivity to sound. The ads serve effectively as an advocate for the 40 million people who are afflicted with migraines, Excedrin’s target audience.

This is a far cry from a few years ago when a previous Excedrin ad campaign drew fire by suggesting two-thirds of women who suffer from migraines would give up shopping to get rid of them. A website called thedailyheadache.com criticized Excedrin’s campaign for “minimizing migraines and treating women as superficial.”

The new campaign is very different. The simulator shows the severity of migraine headache pain and it tells heart-tugging stories that are relatable and shareable. Excedrin has created a strong web presence for the campaign, with more back stories, useful information about migraine symptoms and behind-the-scenes looks at how the Migraine Experience was created

“The reaction of loved ones to the experience spoke volumes,” Excedrin said of the ads. “Once the non-suffered experience what their friend or relative goes through during a migraine, their increased understanding led to a reaction full of empathy and love, which until now was harder to identify.”

The Excedrin ad campaign is further validation of the power of visual explanations that show what you mean.

Making a Better Connection Through LinkedIn

A LinkedIn trainer says the online networking site has hidden capabilities that can make it more personal and less sterile in seeking and engaging new connections.

Blogging and promoting your blogs on social media sites such as LinkedIn is a smart way to demonstrate thought leadership, share valuable content and show off your expertise. It would be even smarter if you exploited all of LinkedIn’s capabilities.

Mic Johnson, a content coach and LinkedIn trainer for Blue Gurus, says some of LinkedIn’s most valuable and useful features are hidden from view for the average user. LinkedIn could make these features more accessible, he says, but meanwhile LinkedIn users can make use of the features if they know where to find them.

One of Johnson’s biggest bugaboos about LinkedIn is its impersonality. Invitations to connect can be sterile, but they can – and, he insists, should – be personalized. The blue “Connect” button makes it easy to send an invite with the clinical “I’d like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn” message. However, Johnson says if you go to someone’s profile and click the button, a dialogue box appears that gives you a chance to describe how you know the person and add a personal greeting.

LinkedIn discourages engagement, Johnson explains, by making it easy to accept an invitation without seeing whether or not the person who extended the invitation wrote a personal note. He suggests clicking on the “quotes” to see if a message was sent before accepting an invitation. You don’t have to respond, but at least you know someone took the time to send you a message.

If you are baffled by how stories or posts appear on your LinkedIn feed, it’s not a surprise to Johnson. He says the LinkedIn default is to give preference to “Top Updates” instead of “Recent Updates.” This increases the likelihood you may not see a post that interests you.

You can change your feed by clicking HOME and looking under “Publish a Post” where they are three little dots that you can pick and select “Recent Updates” as your preference. Irritatingly, Johnson explains, if you leave your home page, LinkedIn will restore “Top Updates” as your home feed default setting.

“I’m not a fan of social networks choosing what they think I want to see instead of the other way around,” Johnson says.

Tucked away on the profile pages of your connections is the largely unnoticed Relationship Tab. Johnson says it can be found below a person’s photo and offers an opportunity to “jot down notes about the person, set follow-up reminders and tag the personal in a category such as prospects."

“I’m a big fan of LinkedIn,” Johnson says. “LinkedIn is one of the best tools out there for connecting with people in business, finding people you share in common with others and consuming and sharing quality content.” 

“Linked needs to spend more time making the user experience more intuitive and stop forcing people to click around to find hidden features,” he adds. But thanks to Johnson, some of LinkedIn’s hidden features have been exposed, allowing you to use LinkedIn like a guru.

Content Marketing Personas

Content personas are similar to buyer persons, but add emphasis on preferred information channels, content consumption habits and frequency of content acquisition.

Content personas are similar to buyer persons, but add emphasis on preferred information channels, content consumption habits and frequency of content acquisition.

Buyer personas are established elements of marketing plans, so why shouldn’t a content persona be appropriate for a content marketing plan.

Buyer personas show how existing or potential customers think, their perceived needs and where they get information. A content marketing persona is similar, but it zeroes in on what kind of content customers view as useful, informative and entertaining.

Buyer and content personals all have the same objective – to convert someone from a viewer into a customer. They both search for triggers for that conversion. They seek ways to establish a bond of trust between brand and buyer.

There are subtle differences. A content persona places more emphasis on preferred information channels, content consumption habits and frequency of content acquisition.

Marketing personas are ways to humanize customer statistics. It is hard to conjure a marketing plan for metadata. It is easier to envision a plan that addresses people with certain kinds of common characteristics. 

Personas reveal "pain points,” “priority initiatives,” “perceived barriers” and “decision criteria.” Marketers like to track the “buyer’s journey” and “success factors.” Content marketers must be mindful of all that within the framework of creating content.

A pain point could involve finding a way to get rid of mold in the shower. A buyer persona might focus on a product. A content persona would show the process of how to use a reputable product to scrub away the mold. It is the difference between promoting a product directly or demonstrating how your product works.

This example illustrates that some “buyers” just want a solution, while others want to be involved in the solution. That oversimplifies the difference between buyer and content personas, but it does show how they differ.

Another key difference is perspective. A buyer persona is intended to mark the path to a sale. A content persona is a roadmap to winning the customer’s trust and, ultimately, loyalty.

Many companies have shifted marketing dollars to content marketing because it matches well with customer relationship management. If all you do is pitch products, you aren’t distinguishing yourself from competitors. If a competitor comes up with a snappier, cooler and cheaper product, your buyer persona is hasta la vista. Competitors have a tougher time busting through the rapport you establish with layers of successful content marketing that deliver continuing value.

Content marketing and personas don’t require throwing away all you know about marketing or buyer personas. They do require a marketing master's degree in how to generate content from the vantage point of a helpful neighbor with a garage full of unbelievably useful tools.

Thought Leadership Can't Be Delegated

Handing over your thought leadership blog to a ghostwriter diminishes the authenticity of your thought and the genuineness of your leadership.

Handing over your thought leadership blog to a ghostwriter diminishes the authenticity of your thought and the genuineness of your leadership.

Professional writers can add polish and zing to your content, but when it comes to thought leadership, the words should come from you.

Demonstrating thought leadership demands more than just coming up with a thought. How you articulate that thought is where the leadership part. Relying on someone else to craft and organize your words leaves you as merely someone who has a thought, not someone who can marshal that thought into actionable language.

Many writing assignments can and should be delegated such as press releases, backgrounders and marketing copy. Professional writing skills and experience can make a huge difference.

When it comes to a blog intended to show you know your stuff, it is disingenuous to hand off the job to someone else. Even if you rattle off a few key points, the final words are someone else's, not yours.

Typical reasons for delegating include a busy schedule, other pressing duties and writer's block. Those all could be true, but step back a moment and imagine an honest beginning to your "thought leadership" blog:

"My ghostwriter wrote this blog because after I had a bright idea in the shower, I didn't have time to expand on it or write it down. Thanks for reading."

Sound like thought leadership to you?

If your thoughts are important enough to think, they deserve the time and attention to write about. Your words make your thought authentic and your leadership genuine.

Readers, especially the ones you want to influence, will be keen enough to tell.