informative

Backstories Forge Bonds with Internal and External Audiences

Backstories can inform fellow workers and impress external audiences. They are a form of storytelling based on authenticity that can convey human feelings and intriguing details as a way to build bonds to a brand.

Backstories can inform fellow workers and impress external audiences. They are a form of storytelling based on authenticity that can convey human feelings and intriguing details as a way to build bonds to a brand.

Think about how an inside job can become a revealing piece of content for the outside world. It could be doubly worth your time.

Going behind the scenes to tell the story of how one part of your operation works can be great content for your internal audience. The story also can be compelling content for your external audience.

Authenticity has always been important, but it has taken on deeper significance in the digital age with the specter of bots, fake feeds and deceptive or reimbursed reviews. Backstories convey authenticity to consumers by personalizing the employees and processes that produce the goods and services they buy. They can be about talented employees, unusual process or colorful personalities. They can appeal to emotions and feelings.

Internal audiences have a built-in interest in learning what their fellow employees do and how they do it. These backstories can be animated with human interest details, which, coincidentally, also hold appeal for consumers who like having a more tangible connection to the people that make a brand.

Antora Energy shares its backstory from the childhood of its founders to its emerging position as helping to create a cleaner electric grid for America.  https://medium.com/cyclotron-road/backstories-antora-energy-d06de388a388 .

Antora Energy shares its backstory from the childhood of its founders to its emerging position as helping to create a cleaner electric grid for America. https://medium.com/cyclotron-road/backstories-antora-energy-d06de388a388.

A smart approach to capturing interesting backstories is to create the equivalent of an editorial board. Its job would be to identify workers or parts of a business that lend themselves to backstory treatment – unique processes, intriguing personalities, unexpected successes. The editorial board then would assign someone or a team to go get the real backstory.

Most organizations have moved beyond a printed newsletter to an intranet or enterprise forums such as Yammer, Slack or Chatter. These platforms expand the range of formats that can used to tell the backstory. A mix of formats, such as video, infographic, photo gallery or podcast, can keep the storytelling fresh and inviting. Smartphone videos and photographs provide ample production values.

The same formats can conform themselves for external sharing through a website, social media or paid advertising. Backstories about your own employees can be a source of interactivity if you invite consumers to share their backstories involving your product or service.

Care needs to be taken to avoid contrived backstories. The stories should be real, even if they aren’t glitzy or heart-melting. If consumers or employees get the scent of hype, the magic of back stories goes poof. 

There is a lot of competing content to break through, regardless whether it’s aimed at an internal or external audience. Backstories can work if they are truly authentic and thoughtfully expressed.

The objective of sharing backstories is to generate bonding – among your own staff, with your consumers and for your brand. Like all forms of storytelling, back stories can attract and hold attention. They also can teach and touch people’s heartstrings.

Aim Digital Content at People, Not Search Engines

When you create marketing content, should you write for your audience or search engine algorithms? One expert says write for your audience, providing informative, useful and relevant content.

When you create marketing content, should you write for your audience or search engine algorithms? One expert says write for your audience, providing informative, useful and relevant content.

When you write a blog or some other form of digital content, is your target audience real people or a search engine? It is more than a theoretical question because without search engine optimization, your content may never reach the eyes of your intended audience.

Writing for Search Engine Journal, Sam Hollingsworth claims writing for a search engine is a mistake. He says digital content producers should focus on “the human beings who are actually reading the content” and let ever-improving search engines do the rest.

“Google’s role in the everyday lives of humans across the world becomes greater each passing minute, deeply rooted in its dedication to ensuring its search engine is giving users the best-possible answers to specific search queries, anytime and anywhere,” Hollingsworth says. “For these reasons, Google (or any other search engine) doesn’t need us to write content that is specifically designed for it. Google serves its users, and it wants content to serve them as well.”

That sounds good, but does it really work that way? It does, Hollingsworth insists, if you follow some basic rules of the road for search engines. Here are for writing “quality content:”

  • Quality content should have a purpose – a topic matched with an audience. The topic should be of interest, relevant and useful to the intended audience. It wouldn’t hurt if it also was entertaining and had some presentational value. Stick to a single topic in each piece of content so you can fully engage readers, not confuse them.

  • Quality content has a unique voice. If your content sounds like anyone could have written it, then you provide little incentive for readers to search for you. People may have favorite genres, but most people appreciate a variety of writing styles. The surest way to write in a unique style is let your writing reflect how you think and speak about topics.

  • Quality content is well researched. It should cover a topic thoroughly and not be limited to a specific word count if the topic demands longer treatment. Solid research should be showcased by effective packaging – headlines, charts and illustrations.

  • Quality content is well written. Copyediting is a must to catch typos and grammatical flubs. Editing for writing style and clarity is also important to put forward your best wordsmithing. Maybe most important, attack your story in an arresting way so it will seem fresh and inviting. It never hurts to make your first sentence the best sentence.

  • Quality content should have an author. Readers will want to know who they are listening to, so tell them. Bylines become reputational business cards attached to quality content. If people trust what you write and find it interesting and informative, they will follow you, which after all is the point of content marketing.

  • Quality content cites sources. Saying where statistics come from is essential to establish credibility. Citations also reflect the reliable sources you are monitoring to prepare your content. Relying on sources has the salutary effect of curbing any temptation to hype a fact.

To the extent content generators need to worry about search engines, they should concentrate on the relevancy of their content. This goes beyond the purpose of the content to the purpose of content marketing. What are your consumers or clients searching for and how can you deliver the content they search?  Your expertise, authoritativeness and trustworthiness need to bend to the simple proposition that you must provide the answers for your intended audience’s questions. There is no other reason for marketing through content.

There are different strategies to consider. You may want to appeal to a wide universe and build a large following. You may increase your clicks and stimulate word-of-mouth engagement. Or you may zero in on a smaller group of people, who have specific questions that, depending on your answers, could convert them from readers to buyers.

Relevance written small or large doesn’t change Hollingworth’s main advice – quality content should aim at people, not algorithms. Understand how search engines work because they are critical to connecting with your audience. But really understand what your audience wants to know – and give it to them.

 

YouTube Channels that Inform, Entertain and Humanize

Michelle Phan went from a makeup blogger to a YouTube phenom by combining her visual subject matter with a medium that matched her target audience’s preference and offering informative, entertaining and humanized video content.

Michelle Phan went from a makeup blogger to a YouTube phenom by combining her visual subject matter with a medium that matched her target audience’s preference and offering informative, entertaining and humanized video content.

People love to watch videos for information and entertainment. One way to capitalize on this popularity is to broadcast your videos on your own YouTube channel.

Socialblade.com has listed the top 100 YouTube channels, which confirms people, especially young ones, like to watch videos that are informative and entertaining. Many of the top 100 are YouTube channels for performing artists, such as Justin Bieber and Beyoncé. And then there is Michelle Phan.

Phan took a blog devoted to makeup tutorials and turned it into a YouTube powerhouse. She has uploaded almost 400 videos since 2007, which have attracted more than 1 billion views. One of Phan’s most viewed videos – 1.5 million views – shows how to style up when attending a music festival.

Other videos talk about hair removal, pimples and makeup tips and tricks. Phan provides trend reports on metallic lips, lift-up shoes, peel-off makeup and glitter freckles. There also are videos that address cyberbullying and acne shaming.

Phan, who was born in Massachusetts, posted a video earlier this year about her trip to Vietnam to meet with family members and discover her ancestral roots. The video is polished, with professional videography and quick clips that take you along for her ride without making you wish you could jump off the bus.

Michelle Phan went from a blogger to a YouTube powerhouse vlogger by using the visual strength of videos to bring her makeup tutorials to life.

Michelle Phan went from a blogger to a YouTube powerhouse vlogger by using the visual strength of videos to bring her makeup tutorials to life.

Phan is regarded as a YouTube personality and entrepreneur. But her secret isn’t really a secret. She took a subject that is highly visual and brought it to life on video. She mastered an on-camera style that makes a potentially boring subject interesting, or even exciting for young women intensely consumed with how they look.

Marketers encourage use of video content because it can boost clicks on social media and websites. Some recommend setting up YouTube channels to create your own broadcasting network to run parallel with a website. We agree with the power of videos, especially as more people interact with the internet on mobile devices.

But more is required than setting up a camera to capture a talking head or an unstaged and unscripted event. Videos worth watching are videos that have been designed with forethought. For example, Phan succeeds on YouTube because her message and her medium match with the preferences of her target audience.

AARP has a YouTube channel that features videos with clips of 1960s rock and roll bands, tips on how to avoid injuring-causing falls and look-backs to major historical events. The YouTube channel for Angie’s List contains videos showing to stain a deck, finding the best body shop after a wreck and deciding whether to repair or replace an air conditioner.

AARP provides a suite of video content on its YouTube channel designed to address issues of interest to older Americans, including an avenue for entrepreneurs to pitch ideas to help seniors maintain an independent lifestyle.

AARP provides a suite of video content on its YouTube channel designed to address issues of interest to older Americans, including an avenue for entrepreneurs to pitch ideas to help seniors maintain an independent lifestyle.

Video provides an opportunity to humanize your brand, infusing it with personality, a life story and first-hand experience. YouTube is a perfect channel to extend your story brand and engage customers. The key is to make your brand extension and customer engagement informative and entertaining so people tune in.