artificial intelligence

Google Veteran Job-Matching Ad Reinforces Value of a Useful Message

Google’s Super Bowl ad reinforced the potency of a TV ad with a straightforward message teamed with a clear call to action. The spot didn’t have glitz, celebrities, jousting knights or party-wrecking NFL legends, but it still packed a punch and made viewers pay attention.

Google’s Super Bowl ad reinforced the potency of a TV ad with a straightforward message teamed with a clear call to action. The spot didn’t have glitz, celebrities, jousting knights or party-wrecking NFL legends, but it still packed a punch and made viewers pay attention.

There are many things to learn from this year’s roster of Super Bowl ads (for example, never invite a bunch of former NFL players to a party), but perhaps the most important lesson is the continuing value of a useful message with a clear call to action.

Google earns my top award in this category for its minute-long spot aimed at assisting veterans match their military expertise to good-paying jobs back home. 

This is not a new undertaking for Google. It has sought to help returning vets for years. The 2019 Super Bowl ad managed to sum up its commitment with a sequence of images showing codes. For most of us, the codes are meaningless. For veterans, the codes represent the skill and specialization they achieved while serving in the military, which can easily be overlooked or undervalued by employers.

The ad’s message is that Google has used its vast online resources to align those military codes with jobs and professions in the domestic economy. It’s like translating French text into English as you read.

Google has teamed with RecruitMilitary, which bills itself as the nation’s leading veteran hiring company and talent recruiter. “We provide the spark that ignites organizations to excel by helping them hire and retain America’s best talent – its veterans,” proclaims the company’s website.

Google’s role is a feature called Cloud Talent Solution that allows veterans to search for job opportunities using their military occupational specialty codes. “The new search function is key to those service members who are actively seeking new career opportunities but are unsure of where to begin. It also delivers a strong starting point for newly transitioning veterans as they begin their post-military career search.” 

The Google Super Bowl ad wasn’t remotely glitzy and didn’t feature scads of celebrities. Instead, it relied on an intriguing message that resonated with transitioning military veterans – as well their families, employers and support communities. One of the greatest sources of untapped talent in the nation are military veterans who have skills. Those skills go for naught unless they have a job-matching map of where to look to apply them.

The ad served the purpose for Google of reminding viewers online searches combined with artificial intelligence algorithms can be a powerful tool that can reap very tangible benefits for individuals and businesses.

The simplicity and straightforwardness of the ad reflects a creative decision to let the message carry the day instead of relying on dazzling graphics or big stars. It reinforces the notion that a good message with a useful purpose is something people will want to hear. 

The military recruitment project by Google is commendable in its own right. The Super Bowl ad elevates the priority of the program while underscoring the value of technology in a complicated modern world. Many of us worry about our privacy and the mis-use of our online data. Google provides us an example of how the internet and machines that learn can deliver a great value to men and women who have earned it.

Gary Conkling Image.jpg

Gary Conkling is principal and co-founder of CFM Strategic Communications, and he leads the firm's PR practice, specializing in crisis communications. He is a former journalist, who later worked on Capitol Hill and represented a major Oregon company. But most importantly, he’s a die-hard Ducks fan. You can reach Gary at garyc@cfmpdx.com and you can follow him on Twitter at @GaryConkling.

 

 

Buckle Up for The Future

“Shows like Westworld show a future world of interaction between humans and robots, which may not be that future-fetched, according to a social media marketer who recommends beginning to cope now for being replaced by a smart machine.”

“Shows like Westworld show a future world of interaction between humans and robots, which may not be that future-fetched, according to a social media marketer who recommends beginning to cope now for being replaced by a smart machine.”

If you are a Westworld fan, you already are steeped in the mysterious interactions among humans, robots and a clandestine corporation. The popular HBO show, which is starting its second season, is more like a video game than real life – or is it?

Larry Kim, CEO of MobileMonkey and a social media marketer, has identified six “massive issues in play” that will impact marketing, employment and possibly our everyday lives. Two of the most striking and perhaps oppositional trends are people living longer and the rise of smart machines that can replace a lot of the work humans do now. It could mean more time in life to be unemployed.

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Kim’s futuristic trends led him to create an infographic listing 10 “critical skills” that he says people will be in high demand in workplaces as early as 2020. One of the most important skills, according to Kim, will be the ability to come up with solutions.

Other skills Kim identifies include cross-cultural competency, new media literacy, adaptive thinking and an ability to work productively in virtual collaborative settings. These skills reflect a more diverse, global economy, a rapidly changing media and information-sharing environment and a premium on getting results. You may be working in your bedroom or at Starbucks, but you will be part of a virtual team.

Apart from noting the need for computational thinking, being trans-disciplinary and having a design mindset, Kim doesn’t offer anything more specific about surviving in an emerging age of artificial intelligence, smart machines and robotic companions (and, eventually) overlords.

Which brings us back to Westworld.  Its co-founder, Jonathan Nolan, calls the show a “metaphor.” Humans show up at a theme park with naughty intentions in which they indulge with robotic hosts. But beyond the sci-fi drama and “evolution of sin,” the underlying question posed by the show deals with human interaction with smart machines that can do more than control the temperature in our houses or alert us when we veer out of a highway lane.

Part of the appeal of the show is that it doesn’t show a static future. Both humans and machines are evolving. Women gain more power and machines become more capable. There also is an intensifying degree of violence.

Kim’s recommended work skills are pitched more for the near term, which is itself fairly unsettling. Westworld casts a glance further into the future, though who knows how far in the future. Between Kim and Westworld, we should get the picture that change is coming, and the changes wrought by artificial intelligence could profoundly affect human life, for good and not-so-good. Westworld may not turn out to be a theme park.