Buyer personas

The Marriage of Brand Personality and Consumer Personas

There is no better example of brand personality married to consumer persona than the Apple ads that personified a PC and a Mac. Today, marrying brand personality with consumer personas is critical to create and sustain an association that supports buying decisions.

There is no better example of brand personality married to consumer persona than the Apple ads that personified a PC and a Mac. Today, marrying brand personality with consumer personas is critical to create and sustain an association that supports buying decisions.

Consumers choose brands as a form of self-expression so it is important for a brand’s personality to match its consumer persona.

It the past, buying decisions were heavily influenced by location and price. You bought groceries, shopped for clothes and dined out at establishments that were nearby and offered good prices.

In the world of digital commerce, buying decisions have more to do with convenience, value and brand personality. Purchases can be made online and shipped to your door. Products are judged by their value, not just their price. Increasingly, consumers prefer to buy brands with compatible personalities.

Marketer Angela Hausman writes that contemporary consumers gravitate to brands with characteristics common to them. “Basically, consumers think about brands,” she explained, “the same way they think about their friends, celebrities, coworkers and public figures.” That is, as an extension of themselves.

Brands today market, you might say, to their respective tribes. One of the best examples of brand personality tribal identification is the series of Apple ads from a few years ago. The Mac was represented by a casual, hip-looking young guy, while the PC was cast as an older, stodgy guy in an ill-fitting suit. The point of the ads wasn’t to say which computer was better, but which computer “looked” more like Apple’s target consumer persona.

As consumer expectations of corporations and brands have expanded, many companies use marketing to strengthen their association with consumers. Anheuser-Busch paid for an ad during the last Super Bowl showing how it converted beer production lines to produce 3 million cans of water for emergency relief efforts in Texas, Louisiana, Puerto Rico and California. Other beverage producers stepped up, too, and Procter & Gamble sent a laundry truck to hard-stricken areas so people could get their clothes cleaned at no charge.

Brand archetypes have been created to express the universe of brand personalities, ranging from conscientious to neurotic and dreamer to seductress. While these archetypes have merit, they fall short of capturing the specifics of a brand’s actual consumer persona. A consumer may buy a can of soup with less sodium because it is healthier or because it comes in a container that can be heated in the office microwave. The soup company should know whether its consumer persona is primarily making a healthy choice or a choice of convenience – or whether they are too lazy to choose something else to eat.

Consumer personas are the most reliable for marketing purposes when they are based on actual consumer contact.  Even though it doesn’t take a magnifying glass to see loads of families go to Disneyland, it is still useful for Disney officials to find out what prompts family trips at specific times to the Happiest Place on Earth.

As we are continuing to discover, social media platforms have become gold mines of personal information that help marketers to track psychographic patterns. Demographics identify who your consumer is; psychographics explain why they buy your product by assembling a picture, sometimes literally, of their attitudes and aspirations. Brands covet that information to direct their marketing – and adjust their brand personalities.

Consumer personas can evolve over time or as a result of technology changes. Women who once loved to shop in their favorite department store now prefer to find what they want online. Instead of using mannequins, stores need to display their apparel on models and in settings that resonate with their target consumer personas. They also need to project an appealing vibe. It’s as if the new challenge is to make consumers want to dress up in your brand personality.

Try as they might, brands can invent their personalities out of whole cloth. Their sense of personality is shared with their consumers. You may see your brand as bright and peppy, but consumers may view it as dull and wimpy. Cadillac has had this problem for years, pushing out cars to compete with German luxury models, but bogged down by a reputation of a living room on four wheels. If brand personalities don’t match with consumer personas, you have a problem.

In previous posts, we’ve encourage companies to picture their consumer (or client) personas, listing their key characteristics and the associations they value. This post urges companies to go further and see if their brand personalities align with their consumer personas. If not, why not? If there is alignment, what do you need to do to maintain the attraction between what your consumers want and what you offer?

Even if there is alignment, what will you need to do to sustain a relationship that extends past location, price, convenience and value to something more basic – do your consumers want to be associated with you. It is not a trivial question. But it can be an energizing one that helps a brand stay fresh, relevant and desired.

Meeting and Marketing to Your Buyer Personas

Effective marketing isn’t about talking louder. It involves sharing smarter. Creating and interacting with buyer personas can help you put a face to your consumer, understand their pain points and follow their journey to your doorstep.

Effective marketing isn’t about talking louder. It involves sharing smarter. Creating and interacting with buyer personas can help you put a face to your consumer, understand their pain points and follow their journey to your doorstep.

In marketing, telling your audience what you want them to hear should take a back seat to sharing what they want to hear from you. It is a distinction with a definite difference. It is the fundamental meaning of the customer comes first.

Marketers aim to deliver a key message regarding their product, service or idea. That, after all, is the point of marketing. However, pushing a message is only part of marketing.

The other, equally important part is crafting a message that an audience will notice, care about, remember and act on. This part of marketing requires research and insight into what your audience is interested in, where it looks for information and who audience members trust.

Few products, services or ideas appeal to everyone, so one of the roles of market research is to pinpoint the target audience whose members would value, need and be willing to pay for what you offer.

Target audiences usually aren’t monolithic, which is why marketers develop (or should develop) buyer personas. These sketches – which can include fictional names, illustrations, hobbies, favorite brands, habits, motivations and pain points – turn a target audience into a series of human faces instead of rows of statistics.

Buyer personas also serve as a flight plan for messaging by tracing the consumer journey, so marketers know where to focus their energy, time and resources to connect with their intended audience – and how to close a sale. Walking in a consumer’s shoes makes it easier to identify and empathize with that consumer.

Developing buyer personas can be hard work, but it also can be fun. It certainly is useful. When you visualize your audience as people – even generalized types of people – you are more likely to think about what they want to hear, not just what you want to tell them. And that can make all the difference in whether a key message hits its mark or veers off into the vapors.

Many non-marketers (and perhaps even some professional marketers) may be unfamiliar with buyer personas. They don’t follow a particular formula. The best ones have a creative bent. The most useful ones derive from actual contact with consumers.

There isn’t a formula to follow to create buyer personas. The only criteria that matters is your fictional buyers fairly represent your actual consumers.

There isn’t a formula to follow to create buyer personas. The only criteria that matters is your fictional buyers fairly represent your actual consumers.

Alexa posted a blog with 10 examples of buyer personas from a range of sectors, adhering to a wide variety of styles and formats. In some cases, consumer pain points were conveyed as consumer frustrations, but the variations prove the point that how you compose buyer personas may be less significant than whether you create them.

Unlike statistics that are spewed from an algorithm, buyer personas can be easily modified as experience dictates. You may get it wrong the first time. But the good news is you are focused on the right end of the marketing megaphone.

You are assessing and responding to where people are at and how to reach them. You have evolved from sending a message to sharing one. It’s a big difference, and an even bigger deal.