organized labor

Good Jobs Nation Tour Elevates Economic Issues

A labor-backed tour started this week that seeks to put pressure on the Trump administration to keep its campaign promises on jobs, but also may signal a move by Democrats to focus on bread-and-butter issues heading into mid-term elections next year.

A labor-backed tour started this week that seeks to put pressure on the Trump administration to keep its campaign promises on jobs, but also may signal a move by Democrats to focus on bread-and-butter issues heading into mid-term elections next year.

Potential Russian election collusion, failed repeal and replacement of Obamacare and a tone-deaf response to violence in Charlottesville has eroded, but didn’t eviscerate President Trump’s hard-core political support. The Good Jobs Nation tour that began this week could pose a more serious political threat.

The two-week tour is designed to put pressure on Trump to live up to his campaign promises on jobs.

“Trump ran as a working-class hero, so let’s look at the results,” Joseph Geevarghese, executive director of Good Jobs Nation, told The Washington Post. “We’re seven months into his administration and wages are flat. People are still getting pink slips.”

The tour pointedly started in Indiana, home of the Carrier plant that starred in the Trump campaign and the early Trump presidency when he announced a deal with company management to keep manufacturing jobs in the United States instead of shifting them to Mexico in return for $700,000 per year in state tax breaks. Labor leaders say Carrier is laying off workers and moving manufacturing to Mexico despite the deal Trump negotiated.

“He made promises to working-class people,” said Chuck Jones, who represented steelworkers at the Carrier plant. “He said if he were president, jobs would not be leaving this country. Guess what? They still are. He could be signing executive orders. He’s not lifting a finger.”

Organized labor is also irked at Trump for turning his back on an Obama-era rule on overtime and a regulation requiring companies bidding on government projects to disclose labor law violations because business groups opposed them. The Communications Workers of America is upset because the Trump administration has failed to respond to its request for an executive order relating to US-based call centers.

Ironically, Trump has defended his record in office by pointing to an uptick on the stock market, continued steady job growth and a slight increase in wages – indicators Trump the candidate scorned as not reflecting the true economic condition staring at many American workers.

Souring relations with blue-collar workers is not a good political sign for Trump or Republicans generally. Those workers provided the marginal votes that enabled Trump in 2016 to carry traditionally Democratic states such as Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania and give him an electoral college victory.

The analytics of congressional districts don’t look all that promising for Democrats heading into the 2018 mid-term elections, which means they will need to bear down on economic issues to erode GOP electoral advantages.

The analytics of congressional districts don’t look all that promising for Democrats heading into the 2018 mid-term elections, which means they will need to bear down on economic issues to erode GOP electoral advantages.

The tour doesn’t overlook that fact. One of the stops is in Wisconsin, which will feature Randy Bryce, a labor organizer who is challenging House Speaker Paul Ryan in his re-election bid next year. Wisconsin is where Taiwan-based Foxconn has announced plans to build a plant to make components for the iPhone in exchange for $3 billion in subsidies, a deal that organized labor is opposing.

Trump, GOP leaders and business groups are likely to dismiss the Good Jobs Nation tour as a political ploy by organized labor and leftist Democrats, noting the kickoff speaker in Indianapolis is Senator Bernie Sanders. While the tour itself may not strike a decisive blow to the Trump presidency, it will elevate questions about Trump’s economic plans and his inability, at least so far, to move forward an economic agenda that includes tax cuts and infrastructure investment. Whether Democrats can take advantage is an open question.

Blue and Red State analytics aren’t all that encouraging for a major Democratic comeback in the 2018 mid-term election. But polls do indicate that the issue Trump supporters watch closely is boosting the economy and spreading the benefits to include people who feel left behind economically.

In the words of former White House adviser Steve Bannon, “The longer they [Democrats] talk about identity politics, I got ’em. I want them to talk about racism every day. If the left is focused on race and identity, and we go with economic nationalism, we can crush the Democrats.”

It will be worth tracking whether the Good Jobs Nation tour reveals a crack in Trump’s blue-collar support or signals a new emphasis by Democrats on bread-and-butter issues.

The Intractable Trade Issue

Oregon Senator Ron Wyden finds himself in the middle of a high-stakes debate over a major free-trade agreement with Asian Pacific partners and the rules by which the Obama administration will need to follow to negotiate the deal. Photo by  SenateEnergy .

Oregon Senator Ron Wyden finds himself in the middle of a high-stakes debate over a major free-trade agreement with Asian Pacific partners and the rules by which the Obama administration will need to follow to negotiate the deal. Photo by SenateEnergy.

Oregon Senator Ron Wyden finds himself in the middle of a major trade policy debate that could affect the ultimate fate of a Trans-Pacific trade agreement sought by the Obama administration.

Oregonian political reporter Jeff Mapes says Wyden, despite a history as a free trader, is the cause of a delayed hearing on so-called fast-track authority for the administration to negotiate a trade deal.

According to Mapes, the hang-up is over how many senators it would take to retract fast-track authority. Congressional Republicans want 67 senators, while Wyden wants 60. Wyden's view matters because he is the ranking Democrat on Senate Finance, the committee that would scrutinize any trade deals.

A free trade agreement with Asian Pacific partners is viewed as one of the major legislative opportunities this Congress for Republicans to work with President Obama in his final two years in office.

Wyden isn't retreating from his free-trade position, even though he has been pressured to do so from organized labor leaders, including Oregon AFL-CIO President Tom Chamberlain. Mapes says Wyden is trying to find middle ground.

For example, Wyden has agreed with opponents that trade pact negotiations are too secretive. "Transparency, congressional accountability ... and enforcement is really the key to coming up with a sensible, bipartisan trade agreement," Mapes reports Wyden as saying. Wyden says he wants a "good deal."

Senate Republicans seem less worried about how trade negotiations are conducted. That is somewhat ironic in light of the controversial letter 47 GOP senators sent this week to Iranian officials expressing their strong desire to approve any nuclear arms limitation deal negotiated by President Obama. 

Trade agreements have special importance to the West Coast and Oregon. The Port of Portland is one of the largest export platforms on the West Coast, which Wyden has acknowledged.

"People want to buy our wheat, they want to buy our computers, our wine," Wyden told Mapes. "The Oregon brand is just on fire all over the world and we ought to be able to get our exports, particularly, into Asia. ... If I could get in a sentence for my economic philosophy, it is  grow things in Oregon, make things in Oregon, add value to them in Oregon and then ship 'em somewhere."

However, Wyden, who is up for re-election in 2016, faces electoral pushback. Chamberlain, while crediting Wyden for working hard to reach out to both sides of the debate, said the senator's position for fast-track authority and a Trans-Pacific trade deal could cost him official labor backing next year.

Democracy for America has sent out a large mailing urging Oregon Congressman Peter DeFazio to challenge Wyden. DeFazio said he has no interest in running against Wyden. 

Related Link: In free-trade fight, Ron Wyden emerges as key negotiating figure in Congress

Deserting the Middle Ground

The ideological middle in Congress is an endangered species. And, contrary to popular belief, it may not be the fault of politicians.

Many have speculated that congressional redistricting, which occurs every 10 years, is a major culprit. As the theory goes, districts are made politically safer for incumbents, which means they cater more to the majority and neglect the minority.

However, Chris Cillizza of the Washington Post says data may not support that theory. He cites the work of a trio of political science professors who wrote a paper titled, "Does Gerrymandering Cause Polarization?" Their answer is "no."

Minimum Wage as Income Inequality Battlefront

Growing public acknowledgement of widening income inequality is taking root in battles at the federal, state and local levels over a higher minimum wage.Raising federal, state and even city minimum wage requirements has emerged as the front line in the larger political battle over income inequality.

What seemed like a somewhat random reference in President Obama's second term inaugural speech has spread to become the battle cry for helping the working poor grasp at least the lowest rung of the middle class.

The debate over a higher minimum wage is at once a legislative issue and a ballot box decision. But most of all, the debate is a proxy for the much more complex question of reducing the disparity and growing divergence of income and wealth between the top 1 percent of Americans and everyone else.

It isn't the only debating forum for income inequality. The bare-knuckles showdown between Boeing and its Machinists Union in Washington over contract concessions served as a convenient object lesson for those seeking to prove that rich corporations are squeezing middle-income wage-earners.