gerrymandering

Momentous Week in Washington Touches on Core National Values

The Supreme Court ruled on gerrymandering and the Census citizenship question, Congress debated emergency border funding and set a date for testimony by former Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller, Trump flew to Japan for a G20 summit and Democratic presidential candidates debated in Miami. It was a pretty momentous week.

The Supreme Court ruled on gerrymandering and the Census citizenship question, Congress debated emergency border funding and set a date for testimony by former Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller, Trump flew to Japan for a G20 summit and Democratic presidential candidates debated in Miami. It was a pretty momentous week.

This has proven to be a momentous week in Washington, DC that touched on the nation’s core institutions and values and how they interrelate.

The Supreme Court, in separate 5-4 rulings, left untouched partisan-tinged congressional district gerrymandering and blocked the Trump administration’s attempt to place on a question about citizenship on the 2020 Census.

The high court’s majority said the US Constitution doesn’t bar politically influenced gerrymandering or allocate authority to the court to police it. In an impassioned dissent, the minority said the ruling is setback for democratic values.

Speaking for the majority, Chief Justice John Roberts said the Trump administration failed to make a persuasive argument that the citizenship question is needed to help enforce the Voting Rights Act. "If judicial review is to be more than an empty ritual, it must demand something better than the explanation offered for the action taken in this case," Roberts wrote. The Census Bureau has said it wants to start printing questionnaires next Monday. Calling the ruling “ridiculous,” Trump indicated he would try to delay the Census “for as long as it takes.”

Meanwhile, Congress struggled to reach bipartisan agreement on an emergency funding measure to address border migration issues before the July 4 recess. The Democratically controlled House and the Republican controlled Senate passed separate versions this week. Among the differences between the two bills is whether there will be specific directions on how the $4.5 billion can be spent. President Trump has threatened to veto the House version. 

The picture of the drowned bodies of Salvadoran migrant Oscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez and his nearly 2-year-old daughter Valeria lie on the bank of the Rio Grande shocked the nation and accentuated calls for actions to address the humanitarian crisis on the border. (Photo Credit: Julia Le Duc/AP)

The picture of the drowned bodies of Salvadoran migrant Oscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez and his nearly 2-year-old daughter Valeria lie on the bank of the Rio Grande shocked the nation and accentuated calls for actions to address the humanitarian crisis on the border. (Photo Credit: Julia Le Duc/AP)

Republicans and Democrats acknowledge there is a humanitarian crisis on the US-Mexico border, punctuated by the widely circulated photograph of a Salvadoran father and his young daughter clutching his neck who drowned in the Rio Grande trying to enter the United States without going through a port of entry.

The uproar caused by the photo and continuing coverage of child migrant holding facilities prompted John Sanders, acting head of US Customs and Border Patrol, to resign. Tellingly, he submitted his resignation to the acting head of Homeland Security.

As Trump flew to Japan for a G20 meeting on Wednesday, Democratic candidates sparred in Miami in the first of two debates in the 2020 presidential election. They talked about health care reform, immigration policy, climate change and economic policy. Trump, who watched the first night’s debate on Air Force One, called it boring as the first 10 candidates staked out largely progressive agendas that included moving away from private health insurance and increasing taxes on wealthy Americans.

The second set of hopefuls, which includes frontrunners Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders, will debate Thursday night.

In Japan, Trump is expected to meet on the sidelines with Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping. His conversation with Xi will likely center on an escalating trade war that is taking its toll on both countries’ bottom lines. Trump snarled at reporters who asked what he will discuss with Putin, telling them it was “none of your business.” Heightened tensions in Iran and Russian military involvement in Venezuela are two probable topics.

Ahead of the summit, Trump lashed out at India, Japan and Germany over trade policy and “security freeloaders.” Trump is expected once again to object to any joint statement at the summit that references the Paris Climate Accord, which will further strain US-French relations. 

Congressional Democrats announced former Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller will testify publicly July 17 before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees. That suggests the two hearings will sequentially deal with Trump’s potential obstruction of justice and Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election..

Questioning of Mueller is virtually certain to zero in on testimony provided to his investigation under oath by White House officials who have been barred from testifying in Congress by Trump’s attorneys. The interrogation could prove pivotal to a decision by House Democratic leaders to draw up articles of impeachment.

Another fight is brewing over foreign policy. Democrats insist Trump needs a congressional declaration of war before launching any military action in Iran. Trump, supported by Senate GOP leaders, says he doesn’t.

A bipartisan resolution calling on the Trump administration to suspend an $8 billion arms sale to Saudi Arabia won’t stop the deal, according to Trump officials.

Under the radar, former Trump Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has been testifying in private to the House Foreign Affairs Committee. A transcript of his testimony released this week included Tillerson’s claim that Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner was in contact with world leaders without coordination with the State Department, often leaving him out of the loop on emerging policies. 

“Tillerson also described the challenge of briefing a president who does not read briefing papers and often got distracted by peripheral topics, noting he had to keep his message short and focus on a single topic,” according to a report in The Washington Post.

 

 

A Perpetual GOP-Controlled Senate May be in Nation’s Future

Senate GOP Majority Leader Mitch McConnell may act like he is politically invulnerable. He may be right.

Senate GOP Majority Leader Mitch McConnell may act like he is politically invulnerable. He may be right.

On OPB’s Livewire radio show over the weekend, Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley said America’s democracy is threatened by gerrymandering, voter suppression and dark money. He left off the growing dissimilarity of makeup of the US Senate to the US population.

Court cases are swirling around seeking to level the playing field on politically motivated gerrymandering, bar voter suppression of communities of color and restrict campaign contributions, or at least bring them fully into the sunshine. 

There is no viable challenge afoot to Senate representation that is becoming more distorted from the one-man, one-vote principle.

New York Times columnist Jamelle Bouie paints a picture of a permanent GOP majority in the US Senate, despite growing Democratically leaning populations on both coasts.

“The Republican coalition of rural whites, exurban whites and anti-tax suburbanites may not be large enough to win the national popular vote in a head-to-head matchup with Democrats,” Bouie writes “But it covers a much larger part of the country’s landmass, giving it a powerful advantage in the Senate.”

When the Constitution was drafted, less populated states feared the dominance of Virginia, the California of its time. Virginia’s population of 747,610 dwarfed Delaware’s 59,094 residents, which led to the Madisoneque compromise giving every state, regardless of its population, two senators.

Fast forward to today and you have California with 40 million residents and Wyoming with fewer than 600,000 each represented by two senators. That’s “a disparity that gives a voter in Wyoming 67 times the voting power of a voter in California,” observes Bouie. 

The disparity is on track to get wider. “By 2040, according to an analysis of Census Bureau data by the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service at the University of Virginia, half the population will live in eight states, with eight other states representing the next 20 percent of the population. The remaining 34 states will hold 30 percent of the population. In the Senate, this would give them 68 seats. Overall, half the country’s population would control 84 of the 100 seats in the chamber.”

The upshot, based on current red state/blue state trends, is a perpetual Republican asset, serving a GOP president and thwarting a Democratic president. Mitch McConnell is not an aberration; he is an avatar of the future.

The distortion that perpetuates GOP control also bedevils the Electoral College, which has delivered victory to more than one candidate, including the current incumbent, who lost the majority vote nationwide. This has led to calls for abolition of the Electoral College and electing presidents by majority vote. Not surprisingly, Republicans and red-state leaders have been cool to the idea.

As the 2020 presidential election comes into focus, Democratic strategists have begun to explore ways to offset the growing predominance of Republicans in the Senate. Bouie reports some of the ideas, inspired by David Faris’ “It’s Time to Fight Dirty,”  have a ring of truth as well as novelty.

One idea is to add more states such as DC and Puerto Rico and break up California into six states, which presumably would give Democrats a net of 14 more or less permanently Democratic senators. Of course, Republicans could respond by following suit in GOP-leaning mega-states such as Texas and Florida.

The Roosevelt Institute offers a similar, but distinctly different alternative – add representatives to the Senate from the Atlantic territories, Pacific territories and Native tribes. A mix of nations – Australia, Brazil, France, Finland and Denmark – have set aside seats in their parliaments for indigenous peoples. Again, it would be hard to imagine Republicans and red states falling for this logic and undoing their home-field advantage.

The underlying conclusion Bouie reaches is that even if Democrats somehow manage to unseat President Trump in 2020, retain control of the House, overcome gerrymandering, thwart voter suppression and blunt dark money, Republicans will still be in the captain’s chair in the Senate, obstructing Democratic initiatives and blocking Democratically appointed judges. The story of Merrick Garland will be repeated and become the norm.

With 22 seats to defend, Senate Republicans would seem vulnerable in 2020. However, only two are in Democrat-leaning states. Democrats hold an Alabama Senate seat, which is likely to flip back to form. In other words, unless Democrats win the Senate against the odds, Bouie says everything else they win may be for naught.