Suzanne Bonamici

Oregonians to Play Key Role in Congressional USMCA Review

Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer and Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici will play pivotal roles on drug pricing and environmental issues as part of the House review of the US-Mexico-Canada trade agreement negotiated by the Trump administration.

Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer and Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici will play pivotal roles on drug pricing and environmental issues as part of the House review of the US-Mexico-Canada trade agreement negotiated by the Trump administration.

Next to immigration, US trade policy is one of the top priorities of President Trump. Winning congressional approval of the US-Mexico-Canada trade agreement (USMCA), which his administration negotiated, is a key plank of Trump’s 2020 presidential election agenda.

House Democrats, led by Speaker Nancy Pelosi, are the major obstacle for Trump’s ambition. Pelosi took steps this week to begin negotiations with Trump’s trade advisers and she put two members of the Oregon congressional delegation in pivotal leadership positions. She also signaled support for a labor enforcement proposal championed by Oregon Senator Ron Wyden.

Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer will co-chair a team focused on drug pricing, while Oregon Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici will co-chair the team examining environmental issues.

Pelosi hasn’t committed to a House floor vote on the USMCA until changes are made, which would require further negotiations with Mexico and Canada. Without House Democratic votes, the trade deal cannot move. Trump has indicated he would like USMCA approved before Congress adjourns for its August recess. Ways and Means Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass, expressed hope that negotiations with House work groups could wrap up in as little as 30 days. 

The delicate negotiations come in the shadow of Trump’s threats to impose escalating tariffs on all Mexican exports to the United States if the country doesn’t do more to stem the flow of migrants from Central America. Trump pulled back from imposing the tariffs after what appears to be a provisional deal was struck with Mexican leaders. He also has pulled back tariffs on steel and aluminum.

Stalemated negotiations and a continuing trade war with China also muddy the congressional water for USMCA. Even in its current form, the USMCA isn’t a slam dunk to pass the legislatures in Mexico and Canada.

The USMCA is effectively an update of NAFTA (the North American Free Trade Agreement), including provisions relating to the digital economy that didn’t exist a quarter century ago. During his presidential campaign and early in his term, Trump threatened to talk away from NAFTA. However, strong business opposition dissuaded that drastic move, which would have disrupted supply chains of US manufacturing and imperiled US agricultural markets in Mexico and Canada.

Since the USMCA was unveiled last fall, congressional Democrats and US labor leaders signaled disappointment with enforcement procedures for labor provisions aimed at closing the pay gap between Mexican and US manufacturing workers. Wyden and Ohio Democrat Sherrod Brown have proposed tougher enforcement provisions. A bipartisan, bicameral delegation of congressional trade staffers returned from a fact-finding mission in Mexico with suggestions for beefing up enforcement. They include new ways to enforce labor provisions auditing 700,000 collective bargaining agreements in Mexico, which could take years to complete.

Provisions related to drugs and environmental issues are other areas that Democrats want to bolster in the USMCA and which Blumenauer and Bonamici will influence.

US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and business groups representing major US exporters are lobbying for approval now. Influential Congresswoman Debbie Dingell, D-Mich, told Bloomberg News, “I talked to Ambassador Lighthizer and everyone understands the things that need to be fixed. There are a number of us who want to get a trade bill. We need a new NAFTA. People are working toward a good bill.”

 

Northwest Congressional Delegation Employs Twitter, Too

President Donald Trump communicates to his political base via Twitter and so do many Members of Congress, including the Pacific Northwest delegation. Issues they tweet about range from orca protection, affordable housing, drug interdiction, family separation at the border and reproductive rights.

President Donald Trump communicates to his political base via Twitter and so do many Members of Congress, including the Pacific Northwest delegation. Issues they tweet about range from orca protection, affordable housing, drug interdiction, family separation at the border and reproductive rights.

President Trump communicates directly with his base via Twitter. So do Members of Congress. Here is a sampler of recent Pacific Northwest congressional member tweets, reflecting the breadth of issues they track and attempt to impact:

  • Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer (@repblumenauer) tweeted his support for the 21 young people challenging the Trump administration in court to protect the environment in light of climate change. “Anyone who is still a climate denier or thinks there’s no hope in saving our planet should read about the Juliana v. U.S. case,” the Portland Democrat said. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals is hearing the case this week to decide whether to allow it to go to trial. Two previous court rulings okayed moving ahead.

  • Oregon Congressman Peter DeFazio (@RepPeterDeFazio), who chairs the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, said investing in the Coast Guard will result in more drug interdiction than spending billions of dollars on a border wall. "An investment in assets for the Coast Guard – both personnel and equipment – would be a heck of a lot better than a static wall that people can go around, under or through," the Oregon Democrat said at a congressional hearing. DeFazio’s comment was posted on Twitter by OPB political writer Jeff Mapes. 

  • Washington Senator Patty Murray (@PattyMurray) tweeted in response to news reports of botched family reunifications art at the US-Mexican border that resulted in long delays and children stuck in vans. “First cages, now vans. This is truly shameful and I will keep fighting to make sure President Trump and his administration are held accountable for this abuse.”

  • Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley (@SenJeffMerkley) tweeted, “It’s time for Congress to pass the bipartisan Uyghur Human Rights Policy Act, and the Trump administration to stop ignoring the ethnic cleansing of China’s Muslim community. The US needs to sanction the officials responsible for these heinous abuses.” 

  • Oregon Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici (@RepBonamici) is using her Twitter feed this week to promote #WorldOceansDay and the need to protect oceanic resources. She is co-chair of the House Oceans Caucus and her congressional district includes the North Oregon Coast. 

  • Washington Congressman Denny Heck (@RepDennyHeck) noted a resolution he introduced to declare June National Orca Protection Month. “There is cause for hope this year,” Heck tweeted. “But hope alone won’t save the Southern Resident killer whales.” 

  • Oregon Congressman Greg Walden (@repgregwalden) marked the celebration of life for Bob Maxwell, 98, a US Army combat solder in World War II who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism in France. Maxwell, who lived in Bend, grew up as a Quaker, but declined classification as a conscientious objector when he was drafted in 1941. He participated in the Allied military campaign in North Africa and was part of the invasion force in Salerno, which earned him a Silver Star. Walden tweeted, “He will forever be cherished in the country that he sacrificed so much to protect, and in the hearts of everyone he interacted with, especially the community in central Oregon.” 

  • Washington Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal (@RepJayapal) tweeted, “Today, I became the FIRST South Asian American woman to preside over the US House of Representatives. Beyond proud to serve in the most diverse Congress in our nation’s history and to hold the gavel today.”

  • Washington Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers (@cathymcmorris) tweeted, “Socialism and human rights do not co-exist.” Her comment came in a story about Rodgers servings as one of two elected lawmakers representing Congress at the United Nations.

  • Oregon Senator Ron Wyden (@RonWyden) tweeted, “Housing is a right, not a privilege. But right now, some families face an impossible choice of paying rent and buying food. The affordable housing crisis in my home state and others demands action to ensure every American has a roof over their head. #OurHomesOurVoices.” His tweet coincided with National Housing Week of Action from May 30-June 5.

  • Washington Senator Maria Cantwell (@SenatorCantwell) used her Twitter feed to announce cosponsoring the Women’s Health Protection Act, which she said, “guarantees a woman’s right to choose nationwide, free from medically-unnecessary restrictions that interfere with a patient’s individual choice or the provider-patient relationship. #StopTheBans

  • Washington Congressman Kim Schrier (@DrKimSchrier) tweeted, “So-called heartbeat bills have no basis in science, and are a cruel attempt to control women’s bodies. I’m proud to stand with @DrLeanaWen and @PPFA to #stopthebans.” Schrier is a pediatrician and was elected to Congress from a suburban Washington House district in 2018.

 

NW Delegation Gains Clout

The congressional delegates from the Pacific Northwest, though largely Democrats such as freshly reelected Senator Jeff Merkley, hold key positions in the 114th Congress. 

The congressional delegates from the Pacific Northwest, though largely Democrats such as freshly reelected Senator Jeff Merkley, hold key positions in the 114th Congress. 

Elections bring change and the biggest change after last year's election was the demotion of Senate Democrats to the minority. Here is a quick look at how the Pacific Northwest delegation stacks up in the just convened 114th Congress:

Senator Patty Murray has been given immense responsibility by her Democratic Caucus, including co-chairing the Super Committee, heading the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and chairing the Veterans Committee and the Transportation and Housing Appropriations Subcommittee. Murray and GOP Budget Chairman Ryan crafted the budget compromise that avoided deep domestic spending cuts and set a framework for a bipartisan roadmap to address longer-term challenges. In the 114th Congress, Murray takes on possibly her most challenging assignment. She gave up her chairmanship of both the full Budget Committee and Transportation/Housing Appropriations Subcommittee to take over the most powerful domestic discretionary issue, health care. Murray will now be the lead authorizer and appropriator on health care, education and workforce development. She is the Ranking Member of the Labor, Health, Human Services and Education Appropriations Subcommittee and the full Health, Education, Labor and Pension Committee.

Senator Ron Wyden will continue as the lead Democrat on the powerful Finance Committee.  Even in the minority, Wyden will wield significant power on the tax writing committee in a year when tax reform may finally percolate to the surface.  The Committee also will have a significant role in financing a transportation reauthorization bill, crafting a Trade Promotion Authority bill, addressing online sales tax and passing a host of tax extenders.

Senator Jeff Merkley, who joined the Appropriations Committee in the last Congress, was recently selected to be the Ranking Member of the Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee. Merkley is the beneficiary of a number of retirements and departing colleagues on the Appropriations Committee and is probably overjoyed to start his second term as the lead Democrat on the subcommittee. Agriculture is huge in Oregon, including the exploding wine industry, and Merkley will be well positioned to promote research and development of key agricultural products. Since coming to Congress, Merkley has been frustrated with the obstructionist tactics of the Republican minority. He led the fight for filibuster reform. It will be interesting to see if Merkley continues to champion the cause now that Democrats are in the minority.

Senator Maria Cantwell will serve as the lead Democrat on the Small Business Committee and remain a member of the Finance and Commerce committees. She will continue to advocate for domestic trade, access to capital for small businesses and renewable energy. Cantwell has shown a keen interest and is well positioned to address the booming oil-by-train shipments that are flowing through Washington State.  Cantwell also will play a key role in the transportation reauthorization bill as she fights to fund freight corridors to facilitate trade and manufacturing. 

Congressman Greg Walden will maintain his position on the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee and his subcommittee chairmanship of Communications and Technology where he will lead discussions surrounding the broadband spectrum and innovative communication technologies to drive the economy. Walden also will lead the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC), which is the political arm of the Republican Party devoted to maintaining and increasing the GOP majority in the House. Walden is widely praised for giving House Republicans the biggest majority since 1931. Speaker John Boehner and Walden are good friends and the Speaker is quick to give the Oregon Republican credit for the 2014 rout.

Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler has shot up like a rocket in terms of congressional influence and committee assignments.  The powerful Appropriations Committee is typically reserved for seasoned members of Congress, but Herrera Beutler fought for and won a coveted spot on the committee as a sophomore member. She wasn't able to lock down a gavel on a Subcommittee this Congress, but she will continue to accrue seniority. Congressional leaders will find ways to elevate the Congresswoman’s public profile as a rising leader in the party. She was featured this week in the GOP's 10 Questions series. You can find the link here.

Congressman Peter DeFazio surrendered his leading role as Ranking Member of the House Resources Committee in favor of taking over as the lead Democrat on the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. With the likelihood of a transportation reauthorization bill set to move this Congress (the current bill expires in May), DeFazio will have a unique opportunity to shape the massive transportation bill. One surprise the Oregon Democrat didn't expect last week was receiving a vote for Speaker of the House. Rep. Dan Lipinski, a close friend of DeFazio's and a fellow Democratic member of the T&I Committee, shocked everyone when he impulsively shouted out DeFazio's name. DeFazio quickly distanced himself from the situation and said he had no idea Lipinski would do it.  Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi lost the vote of three other Democrats while Boehner lost 25 of his fellow Republicans. If Boehner had lost 29 votes, it would have been a long day.

Congressman Earl Blumenauer, as a member of the House Ways and Means Committee, will be one to watch as Congress tackles comprehensive tax reform. Blumenauer is expected to drive continued sustainable investment, green energy and look for ways to integrate these concepts into the tax code. As Congress addresses transportation reauthorization, look for Blumenauer to advocate for a gas tax increase and push for piloting a vehicle-miles-travelled program. 

Congressman Kurt Schrader secured an impressive victory on Friday and is now a member of the powerful Energy and Commerce Committee. Schrader said he wanted to use the new committee position to address health care issues that plagued the Cover Oregon website, focus more attention on renewable energy and reduce overly burdensome government interference in the marketplace.  Because of the A-level assignment, Schrader has to leave his posts on the House Agriculture, Budget and Small Business committees.  It's likely Schrader, a moderate with an independent streak, received the coveted prize because a couple fellow Blue Dog Democrats on the Committee lost their seats.

Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici, a rising leader in the Democratic Party, will continue to serve on the House Education and Workforce Committee and influence policy decisions through her Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce Training. Bonamici will keep her position on the Science, Space and Technology Committee, including her Ranking Member position on the Subcommittee on Environment. Here, she will be considering issues related to the EPA, environmental regulations and aspects of the broader climate change debate. 

Congressman Denny Heck will continue to serve on the Financial Services Committee and promote his New Democrat agenda. Heck was just named as chair of the DCCC Recruitment Committee, where he will work with Democratic candidates from around the country to try and rebuild the party. Heck is facing an uphill battle as the Democrats took a beating in 2014. To retake the majority, Democrats need to win a net of 30 seats. It's not impossible. In the 2016 presidential election, 26 House Republicans will occupy districts that President Obama won in 2012. Freshmen Members of Congress typically focus squarely on the needs of their districts and that is what Heck did. Recognizing the significant impact of Joint Base Lewis McCord on his district, Heck made military housing, veterans care and transportation infrastructure his top priorities. Heck is also a consummate legislator. Even as a freshman, he was successful in passing a bill that addresses underwater mortgages by giving additional flexibility to the Federal Housing Administration. Getting a bill passed in this dysfunctional Congress as a freshman in the minority is a testament to Heck's ability to navigate the legislative process.

NW Delegation Continues to Move On Up

Senator Patty Murray is just one of many NW congressional delegates growing in influence on the national political scene.

Senator Patty Murray is just one of many NW congressional delegates growing in influence on the national political scene.

While there may be a lack of close, competitive federal races in the Pacific Northwest, there is something to keep an eye on. 

The increasing seniority of Members of Congress from Oregon and Washington will continue to grow in the next Congress and the region’s influence may be nearing an all-time high. Here is a quick snapshot of the opportunities facing our region’s most influential policymakers.

Senator Patty Murray's rise to power is one of the most underreported stories in politics. Murray has been given immense responsibilities by her Democratic caucus, including co-chairing the Super Committee, heading the DSCC and chairing the Veterans Committee and the Transportation and Housing Appropriations Subcommittee. Murray and GOP Budget Chairman Paul Ryan crafted the budget compromise that avoided deep domestic spending cuts and set a framework for a bipartisan roadmap to address longer-term challenges.

Because of Senator Tom Harkin's (D-IA) retirement, Murray could take over as chair or ranking member on the Labor, Health and Human Services and Education Appropriations Subcommittee, which is responsible for the largest domestic spending bill by far and funds the Department of Health and Human Services, Education and Labor. Murray would have to give up her top spot on the Transportation and Housing Appropriations Subcommittee, but the opportunity will likely be too good to pass up.

Senator Ron Wyden will continue to lead the powerful Finance Committee as chair if Democrats stay in power or ranking member if the GOP controls the Senate. Even if he is in the minority, Wyden will continue to wield significant power on the tax writing committee in a year when tax reform may finally percolate to the surface.  The Committee also will have a significant role in financing the transportation reauthorization bill, crafting a Trade Promotion Authority bill, addressing online sales tax and passing a host of tax extenders.

Senator Jeff Merkley, who joined the Appropriations Committee this past Congress, could ascend to become an Appropriations subcommittee chair or ranking member in the next Congress. Because five or six senior Democratic appropriators are either retiring or will lose their races, Merkley could be catapulted to one of the more senior members of the Appropriations Committee. As a member of the Banking Committee, Merkley has championed banking reform measures to ensure financial institutions are held accountable for bad decisions and also tried to separate the banking and investment arms of financial institutions. Merkley has been frustrated with the obstructionist tactics of Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and has led the fight for filibuster reform. It will be interesting to see if Merkley continues to champion the cause should Democrats lose control of the Senate. There will be plenty of fellow Democrats who will want to employ the filibuster as often as it was used against them.

Senator Maria Cantwell, chair of the Small Business Committee and member of the Finance and Commerce committees, will continue to advocate for domestic trade, access to capital for small businesses and renewable energy. Cantwell has shown a keen interest and is well positioned to address the booming oil-by-train shipments that are flowing through the Northwest. Cantwell also will play a key role in the transportation reauthorization bill as she fights to fund freight corridors to facilitate trade and manufacturing.

Congressman Greg Walden will maintain his position on the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee and his chairmanship of Communications and Technology Subcommittee where he will continue to lead discussions surrounding the broadband spectrum and innovative communication technologies to drive the economy. Walden also will continue to lead the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC), which is the political arm of the Republican Party devoted to maintaining and increasing the GOP majority in the House. There has been some speculation that a few fellow GOPers are vying for the position, largely due to the NRCC’s low fundraising numbers. However, Walden has friends in high places, namely Speaker John Boehner, and it’s likely the GOP will pick up nearly a dozen seats this election, cementing his tenure for another two years. Boehner is quoted saying that Walden is working “tirelessly” on behalf of Republican candidates and that he is a “big reason” the GOP has the opportunity to increase its majority.

Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler has shot up like a rocket in terms of congressional influence and committee assignments. The powerful Appropriations Committee is typically reserved for seasoned members of Congress, but Herrera Beutler fought for and received a coveted spot on the committee as a sophomore member of Congress. It’s unlikely she will be able to chair an Appropriations subcommittee, but she will accrue seniority. Congressional leaders will continue to find ways to elevate her public profile as a rising leader in the party.

Congressman Peter DeFazio could face an interesting choice after the election. DeFazio is the ranking member of the House Resources Committee, an important committee for the Congressman’s district that has a wide swath of federal lands. However, it’s likely Rep. Nick Rahall (D-WV), the lead Democrat on the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, will lose his House seat in the upcoming election. DeFazio would be next in line to take over the top transportation post. With the likelihood of a transportation reauthorization bill set to move in the next Congress (the current bill expires in May), DeFazio would have an opportunity to shape the massive transportation bill if he were to take up the mantle for Democrats on the Transportation Committee. However, under Democratic Caucus rules, you can’t lead two committees, so DeFazio would have to make a choice between Resources and Transportation. Heading the Transportation Committee may be an opportunity the Congressman can’t pass up.

Congressman Earl Blumenauer, as a member of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee, will be one to watch as Congress tackles comprehensive tax reform. Blumenauer is expected to drive continued investment in sustainable, green energy and look for ways to integrate these concepts into the tax code. As Congress addresses transportation reauthorization, look for Blumenauer to advocate for a gas tax increase and push for piloting a vehicle-miles-travelled program.

Congressman Kurt Schrader is expected to maintain his posts on the House Agriculture, Budget and Small Business committees. On these committees, Schrader will play a role in the continued debate over the national debt and remain influential over USDA and rural development policy. Schrader’s position on the Agriculture Committee will be critical as he works with fellow delegation members DeFazio and Walden to advocate for a responsible solution to the O&C lands issue.

Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici, a rising leader in the Democratic Party, will likely continue to serve on the House Education and Workforce Committee and influence policy decisions through her Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce Training. Bonamici is also safe to keep her position on the Science, Space and Technology Committee, including her ranking member status on the Subcommittee on Environment. Here, she will be considering issues related to the EPA, environmental regulations and aspects of the broader climate change debate.

Congressman Denny Heck is seeking his second term in the House. As freshman, members of Congress typically focus squarely on the needs of their districts and that is what Heck has done. Heck recognizes the significant impact of Joint Base Lewis McCord on his district and has made military housing, veterans care and transportation infrastructure his top priorities. Heck is also a consummate legislator. Even as a freshman, he was successful in passing a bill that addresses underwater mortgages by giving additional flexibility to the Federal Housing Administration. Getting a bill passed in this dysfunctional Congress as a freshman in the minority is a testament to his ability to navigate the legislative process. Heck will likely continue to serve on the Financial Services Committee and promote his New Democrat agenda.

The Intersection of Clout and Dysfunction

Oregon is gaining seniority and political clout in Congress, but is that power as effective as it once was in a Congress known more for its dysfunction than its accomplishments?Oregon may be on the threshold of reaping the benefits of congressional seniority as members of the state delegation move into higher-profile and more powerful positions. But Oregonian political reporter Jeff Mapes wonders whether seniority in a dysfunctional Congress is as important as it once was.

For years, Oregon power brokers jealously eyed the political clout of Washington's delegation, with Warren Magnuson as chair of Senate Appropriations and his protégé Congressman Norm Dicks as a rising star in House Appropriations. When asked about the value of chairing Senate Appropriations, Magnuson famously said it was all about sharing — if Alabama got a project funded, then one was funded in Washington; if Maine got a project funded, then another one was funded in Washington.

Oregon experienced its own political heyday when Mark Hatfield as chair of Senate Appropriations, Bob Packwood as chair of Senate Finance, Al Ullman as chair of House Ways and Means and Bob Duncan and later Les AuCoin as members of House Appropriations. Hatfield didn't approach his chairmanship with the same swagger as Magnuson, but he still managed to bring home a lot of bacon.

Bonamici Scores Lasting Victory

Democrat Suzanne Bonamici cruised to victory in a special congressional election and she may have the seat for as long as she wants it. Democrat Suzanne Bonamici cruised to a double-digit victory over Republican Rob Cornilles in this week's special election to replace Oregon 1st District Congressman David Wu, who resigned last year amid a sex scandal.

Bonamici's convincing win didn't surprise many people, but explanations for her success don't always ring true. Republicans, including House Speaker John Boehner, dismiss the 1st District and Oregon generally as a liberal-leaning part of the Left Coast.

That generalization overlooks the fundamentals that have turned Oregon's 1st Congressional District into a Democratic bastion since 1974, when in the wake of the Watergate scandal Les AuCoin became the first Democrat in state history to capture the congressional seat since it was created in 1893.

Voters in the 1st District, which in the 1970s included Lake Oswego, Lincoln City and more rural areas than now, didn't suddenly change their political philosophy. What happened was the growth of a working Democratic majority, backed by an effective political apparatus that gets out voters who support Democrats.

First District Race a Yawner

David Wu's resignation amid a sex scandal teed up expectations of national media attention to select his successor, as it did when Andrew Weiner resigned after his sexting scandal. Photo by BikePortland.org.Oregon's First Congressional District special election next month has failed to capture national attention as expected. In fact, former Congressman David Wu has attracted more press notice by showing up on Capitol Hill to attend congressional hearings.

Wu's resignation this fall amid a sex scandal involving an under-age woman, which Wu continues to deny, seemingly set the stage for national political theater, akin to what happened in the wake of New York Congressman Andrew Weiner's resignation following a sexting scandal. But it hasn't happened here, at least so far.

To be sure, some national campaign money has flowed in for ads for and against Democrat Suzanne Bonamici and Republican Rob Cornilles. But neither has been hounded by a horde of reporters from national media. Both are running generally positive ads about themselves and the values they offer. The race as a result has been rather ho-hum.

One leading public opinion poll suggests Bonamici is leading Cornilles by a 52-41 margin, which could account for the lack of interest. If Cornilles was leading, the race would be touted by GOP leaders as a further sign of voter rejection of President Obama and Congressional Democrats. Fox News would be all over the story.

Oregon Race in National Spotlight

The January 31 election of a replacement for former Congressman David Wu is certain to draw national attention, and financial contributions and will serve as the latest test of electoral appeal between Republicans and Democrats.

Individual congressional elections are usually more of a reflection of local political views and constituent issues. However, politics has moved onto a national stage in a contest over issues such as health care, fiscal policy and foreign policy. After Republican Rob Cornilles and Democrat Suzanne Bonamici comfortably won their respective primaries November 8, they immediately plunged into the special general election, which looks to be the first congressional election of 2012.

Bonamici shored up her base by holding a press conference the day after the election with her two major primary opponents, Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian and Rep. Brad Witt, who both pledged their support.

Cornilles used his first post-primary speech to claim Bonamici supports a huge cut in Medicare.