Obama

Big News Comes Under Small Headlines

An unremarkable resolution promoting breastfeeding provoked a stunningly aggressive action by a US delegation to throttle it, at least until the Russians stepped in to salvage the resolution.

An unremarkable resolution promoting breastfeeding provoked a stunningly aggressive action by a US delegation to throttle it, at least until the Russians stepped in to salvage the resolution.

Sometimes the most revealing stories are the ones with small headlines reporting on events occurring in the shadows. Such as the stories reporting the United States aggressively sought to block a global resolution backing breast-feeding and deleting language favoring soda taxes to reduce obesity.

In both cases, the US position appeared in alignment with positions advocated by infant formula manufacturers and soda producers. Perhaps ironically, Russian delegates stepped in to preserve the global resolution backing breast-feeding. The delegates said they based their decision on “principle.”

Research solidly supports breast feeding, which makes the US position at the World Health Assembly in Geneva all the more puzzling and stunning to delegates from around the world, according to The New York Times

This wasn’t a friendly disagreement. Ecuador offered the resolution and the American delegation threatened to “unleash punishing trade measures and withdraw crucial military aid,” the Times reported. Ecuador capitulated.

“The showdown over the issue was recounted by more than a dozen participants from several countries, many of whom requested anonymity because they feared retaliation from the United States,” the Times said. Other nations balked at requests to offer a substitute resolution in the wake of the US action. At least until Russia stepped in. The US delegates didn’t threaten the Russians.

Delegates were reportedly stunned by the “intensity” of the Trump administration’s opposition. They pointed to the $70 billion global baby food industry lurking in the shadows of the assembly. They also noted the Trump team’s position was diametrically opposed to the position expressed by the Obama administration.

“We were shocked because we didn’t understand how such a small matter like breast-feeding could provoke such a dramatic response,” an Ecuadorean official, who asked not to be identified because she was afraid of losing her job, told the Times.

At the same assembly, US officials successfully throttled a statement supporting soda taxes. That position squares with a Trump effort in NAFTA negotiations to limit Mexico’s and Canada’s ability to require labels on sugary beverages.

“The [US] delegation’s actions in Geneva are in keeping with the tactics of an administration that has been upending alliances and long-established practices across a range of multilateral organizations, from the Paris climate accord to the Iran nuclear deal to NAFTA,” the Times summarized.

The Trump administration has threatened to cut its $845 million contribution to the World Health Organization, which represents 15 percent of the group’s total budget.

“It’s making everyone very nervous, because if you can’t agree on health multilateralism, what kind of multilateralism can you agree on?” said Ilona Kickbusch, director of Global Health Center.

 

The 2016 Political Season Just Gets Whackier

A Virginia man who supports Donald Trump for president swears he saw his candidate’s face on a bathroom floor while sitting on his toilet. It wasn’t the weirdest thing in the whacky world of politics.

A Virginia man who supports Donald Trump for president swears he saw his candidate’s face on a bathroom floor while sitting on his toilet. It wasn’t the weirdest thing in the whacky world of politics.

Just when you thought the political season couldn’t get weirder, it did. House Democrats staged a sit-in over gun legislation, an Iowa congressman implied replacing Andrew Jackson with Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill was racist and a Donald Trump supporter said he saw his candidate’s face on his bathroom floor tile.

Somehow, that last story may be the least bizarre of these three.

Sit-ins were ubiquitous in the 1960s and 1970s as a preferred form of non-violent protest. In an ironic revival, House Democrats, led by Congressman John Lewis -- a veteran of sit-ins of yore -- employed the technique to protest congressional inaction in the face of continuing gun violence. Some 40 participating congressional protesters chanted, “I’m sick and tired of being sick and tired.”

The sit-in followed late-night votes in the Senate on four separate gun bills, all of which failed to get enough votes, even though two of them involved denying access to guns for people on terrorist watch lists.

Congressman Steve King blamed President Obama for a “divisive” proposal to place a black woman, who is one of America’s most famous abolitionists, on U.S. Currency. He said it would be “unifying” to leave the $20 bill alone. The House GOP leadership dismissed King’s idea.

A Virginia man sitting on his toilet swears he saw his man Trump’s face on his bathroom floor. Trump images apparently are everywhere. According to The Huffington Post, a Google engineer vacationing in California saw Trump in the image of a deep-fried churro with yellow frosting. And a series of pictures of droop-mouthed pooches sporting Trump gear are circulating on social media. They're called "Dogald Trumps." 

Ultimately, the sit-in, King’s proposal to scratch Harriet Tubman and The Donald floor tile are mostly sideshows to even weirder stuff. Such as the paltry $1.3 million the Trump presidential campaign has in the bank after a full month as the presumptive GOP nominee. Or spending records that show Trump has paid 10 percent or more of his campaign cash to his own companies. The records also reveal Trump’s campaign bought up $208,000 worth of hats in May, while spending just $48,000 on data management and $115,000 on online advertising.

Weirder still, after withering media coverage that Trump’s businesses have stiffed contractors, sent manufacturing jobs overseas, used bankruptcies to turn losses into gains and profited from huge debt, more Americans trust Trump to run the U.S. economy than Hillary Clinton.

An online group polled 1,000 adult Americans and discovered a majority of men and women wouldn’t sleep with Trump for $1 million. In Trump’s case, the average it would take to convince a woman to have sex with him was $1.35 million. Men only wanted close to $1.1 million. The numbers were a little better for Clinton but not much. Her average price for sex with women was $1.26 million and $1.16 million with men. Bernie Sanders didn’t have a lot of takers either for a mere $1 million.

The weirdest thing of all is that this all occurred outside of a Saturday Night Live comedy sketch. SNL definitely will have to up its game.

Big Guns Roll into Northwest

Biden was in Tacoma last week to support Senator Patty Murray, who faces a tough battle against Republican Dino Rossi.President and Mrs. Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, former President Bill Clinton and Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele are making the rounds in the Pacific Northwest this month to campaign for House, Senate and gubernatorial candidates.  The November 2 mid-term elections  are shaping up as high-value targets in races aimed at rebalancing power in Washington this year -- and setting the stage for a presidential re-election bid in 2012.

Democrats hold a 39-seat majority in the U.S. House and a 9-seat advantage in the Senate. Senior Democrats are being dispatched throughout the Northwest to help candidates in tough races, energize a dissatisfied Democratic base and save their endangered congressional majorities.