Crisis communications

Owning, Fixing and Talking About Your Crisis

It is hard to fix a crisis you don't own.

It is hard to fix a crisis you don't own.

"Failing to own a crisis is like walking away from an opportunity to show your character, resiliency and values," CFM President Gary Conkling advised a group of water agency officials. "You will be choosing a road other than the road to redemption."

Conkling was invited to be the keynote speaker at a meeting of the Pacific Northwest Chapter of American Waterworks Association. The meeting was centered on strategic communications by water agencies. The title of his talk was "Owning, Fixing and Talking About Your Crisis." "I honestly believe crisis response is that simple," Conkling said. "Unfortunately, it isn't that easy."

A leading crisis communications counselor, Conkling said it is hard to "fix a crisis you don't own." "An insufficient apology or an evasive explanation won't put a crisis to rest," he explained.

Owning a crisis involves acknowledging what happened, expressing an appropriate emotion, apologizing and providing relevant detail about why it happened and why it won't happen again, Conkling said. "Owning a crisis doesn't involve saying you have everything under control, telling people not to worry or urging people to trust you."

"By definition, a crisis means events are out of control," he said. "You can't stop people from worrying. Your words don't elicit trust. Only actions can do that." 

Fixing a crisis relies on taking "demonstrable steps that show you own the crisis and are willing to deal with the root cause of the crisis." 

Talking about your crisis response "is easier when you have something to say," Conkling said. 

Sometimes it is smart, he said, to talk with stakeholders or neighbors before a crisis occurs. "People respect you for telling them what could happen," Conkling said. "The absence of an incident actually reinforces your trustworthiness. They assume the potential problem you discussed with them is being managed well." 

"A crisis may uncover something you wished would have stayed hidden," he said. "But your crisis response can demonstrate your openness to owning a potential problem and addressing it responsibly."

Gary Conkling Crisis Communications

If you are interested in having Gary Conkling speak to your organization about Crisis Communications, you can contact him here. For more Crisis Communications advice from Gary Conkling, visit the CFM Crisis Ebook.

Turning Crisis into Reputation Opportunity

More than 50 people heard tips on how to turn a crisis into a reputation-saving opportunity at a crisis-preparedness seminar this week.

CFM President Gary Conkling shared five crisis-response tips, including the importance of believing a crisis can happen to you. "If you don't think it can happen to you," he said, "you won't take steps to identify and assess your vulnerabilities and prepare a response."

Organizations are more likely to prepare for crisis if they put their reputations first. "Once you realize your reputation is at risk," Conkling said, "you are more likely to develop and update a crisis response plan." 

Overall, Conkling explained, organizations should think more deeply and more often about their reputations. "They are hard to earn and easy to lose," he said. "You should be thinking routinely about actions you can take that avoid crisis and can be turned into opportunities that save or even enhance your reputation."

The crisis-preparedness seminar was cosponsored by Durham & Bates and the Ladd Group. It is part of an occasional series of presentations offering information of value to senior corporate, nonprofit and public agency leaders.

"We are not pitching business," said Christen Picot of Durham & Bates. "We are sharing information so we are viewed as valuable business partners."

 

Click here to download a .pdf of the Crisis Response handout.