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Entries in Medicare (2)

Monday
Jun112012

Surprise Decision Strains Reform Support

The decision caught almost everyone by surprise last week. The Governor's Office and the Oregon Health Authority said they would not make any of the $2 billion in new federal money obtained by the Administration available for the first year of health care reform in Oregon.

"Members of the new groups (Coordinated Care Organizations, CCOs) are crying foul," reported The Oregonian, "after a directive Thursday that they'll receive no new funds for the additional responsibilities they've agreed to take on — mental health care, prevention efforts, quality measurements and new patient-care staff, among others."

In fact, managers of the new, still-not-yet-approved CCOs have been told they will have to live with last year's rates, which themselves represented an 11 percent cut. Leaders of the new groups say their success relates directly to the new money to fund them. They say it takes money to revamp care for more than 600,000 Oregonians covered by Medicaid, the joint federal-state program that provides care for low-income citizens.

In touting health care reforms such as CCOs and the Health Insurance Exchange, Kitzhaber has stressed the need to control costs through competition and innovation.

For many in the health care reform orbit, all of this conjures up images of the original Oregon Health Plan more than 15 years ago, also designed by Governor Kitzhaber in his earlier service as Oregon Senate President and as governor in his first term. A key tenet of the plan then was that providers would be paid close to their costs for delivering services. The clear objective was to limit the cost shift onto the backs of private health insurance payers.

Well, that tenet apparently has been lost in the intervening years.

Today, those with private health insurance pay about 20 per cent more in premiums as they bear the "hidden tax" of paying for Medicaid underfunding. In a 2008 study, the Milliman Group estimated underfunding of Medicaid and Medicare amounted to more than $90 billion annually.  Though four years old, the study is still applicable today.

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Monday
Apr022012

The Possibility of a Nuanced Ruling

Most media focused last week on oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court on the controversial federal health insurance mandate for individual Americans. However, justices also heard arguments on other aspects of the legal challenge to what has become known as ObamaCare that could lead to a more nuanced decision and perhaps even more complexity for states.

Justices listened to arguments on whether the constitutional challenge of the individual mandate is ripe because it hasn't gone into effect yet. Commentators expressed doubt the court would effectively punt a big decision for this reason. They also considered the severability of the federal health care reform act. They wanted to know if voiding the individual mandate would void the popular ban on excluding health insurance because of pre-existing conditions. 

A ruling isn't expected until late June, which will allow for a lot of media speculation, political bombast and unease by state officials who will play a key role in implementing health care reform in whatever form it survives from the court case.

Based on the intense questioning by justices and the balky performance of the U.S. attorney arguing the government's case, you could easily conclude the federal individual health insurance mandate is in trouble. The court seems clearly split, but the split echoing from the questioning suggests at best a 5-4 rejection of the mandate.

However, the mandate underpins a grander bargain. Creating the largest possible pool of people with health insurance coverage gives health insurers the ability to absorb and spread costs, including from new insureds who may be combating cancer or suffering from a chronic disease. Dispatching the mandate could put even more pressure on health insurance premiums, which are continuing to rise. That, in turn, could erode the quality of existing employer-provided health insurance and, in some cases, cause employers to drop coverage for employees altogether.

The unspoken part of the story crowded out by commentary on the mandate is what happens if we return to the status quo before Congress approved ObamaCare. The truth is, that status quo has disappeared. 

  • The exclusion of pre-existing conditions and expansion of family coverage to children up to age 26 are very popular provisions, which few would want to lose — especially in an election year.

  • Many employers facing stiff domestic and international competition are looking for ways to trim their health insurance costs. One way is to hire temporary workers without benefits.

  • The public safety net has more holes in it, as Medicaid participation has been limited and funding cut for public health care clinics.

  • Heath care technology continues its steady march ahead, opening new diagnostic and treatment options and adding more costs.

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