Search
Our Expertise

Our Expertise

We are viewed as experts — in public affairs, media relations, research and lobbying. Find out why. Click here.

Entries in John Kitzhaber (61)

Thursday
Nov062014

Kitzhaber Wins Re-election, But by Narrow Margin

Democrats retained and even strengthened their grip on control of the state house and legislature as Oregonians said yes to legal weed and no to labeling of genetically modified foods and the much touted top-two primary. The story wasn't so good for Democrats nationally as they saw their majority in the U.S. Senate evaporate, giving Republicans control of both houses of Congress.

The story of the night was the relatively narrow victory by Governor John Kitzhaber, who claimed an unprecedented fourth term without a majority. On a series of critical news reports about First Lady Cylvia Hayes, including charges she may have leveraged her influence with the governor for personal gain, Kitzhaber's double-digit lead in the polls shrunk to a 5 percentage point victory.

The tighter-than-expected race appears to be more a reflection on Kitzhaber than his GOP opponent Dennis Richardson and raises questions about how the governor will fare going forward, especially if the Hayes scandals continue to dog his administration.

Click to read more ...

Thursday
Oct092014

First Lady Faces Conflict of Interest Charge

Willamette Week delivered a pre-election wallop to Governor John Kitzhaber's re-election campaign this week with an investigative report suggesting First Lady Cylvia Hayes may have benefitted financially from her special relationship with the governor. 

Rep. Dennis Richardson, Kitzhaber's underdog Republican challenger, seized on the story and said via a statement, "The latest scandal shows once again that the State of Oregon is being run more like a mafia than a public entity. The governor and first lady are not above the law."

Kitzhaber denies any wrongdoing by himself and Hayes. He said Hayes' contracts were reviewed carefully for any conflict of interest. "We were very proactive," Kitzhaber told The Associated Press. "Very rigorous and very transparent." AP reported Hayes declared three conflicts of interest in August 2013. Kitzhaber said Hayes has no current contracts that touch on state government.

The conflict of interest charge against Kitzhaber and Hayes comes amid a continuing controversy involving GOP Senate challenger Monica Wehby, whom Buzzfeed has accused of plagiarizing health care policy talking points from Karl Rove and her Republican primary challenger, Rep. Jason Conger.  

Click to read more ...

Thursday
Oct022014

Behind the Scenes of a Gubernatorial Debate

Hosting a live political debate starts with convincing candidates to attend and extends through coordinating the format and posing provocative questions. Over the past few weeks, CFM had the opportunity to assist the Oregon Association of Broadcasters (OAB) organize and stage the September 26 gubernatorial debate in Sunriver. 

There were numerous conference calls and lots of personal persuasion that resulted in the debate, which sparked sharp exchanges and defined significant differences between Governor John Kitzhaber, seeking an unprecedented fourth term, and his GOP challenger Dennis Richardson, a state legislator from Central Point.

CFM staff researched previous political debates to discover what formats worked best and made recommendations to OAB and the Kitzhaber and Richardson campaigns. They worked closely to ensure everyone involved was comfortable with the process and the program to avoid any awkward last-minute back-outs.

Special attention was given to what questions were asked. CFM staffers took the view that questions should reflect what Oregonians want to know from candidates. They aided OAB in canvassing broadcasters statewide for the most pertinent and sharp-edged questions. Working with debate moderator Matt McDonald of KTVZ, they winnowed more than 90 questions submitted by broadcasters to the ones actually asked of the candidates.

Click to read more ...

Monday
Jun162014

Voters Enmeshed Again in GMO Politics

Oregonians will likely vote again this fall on genetically modified crops, an issue that many view with passion and others with fear and loathing.

The battle over GMO crops pits farmers against farmers, threatens to upset the balance of trade and raises suspicions among consumers and the hackles of agrochemical companies such as Monsanto. It is better than a reality TV show. And it often has the same level of loud discourse. 

Some have tried to encourage peaceful co-existence among farmers with so-called engineered crops and farmers with non-engineered crops. Advocates of this approach say it requires adequate buffers between the two kinds of crops so organic fields aren't infiltrated and cross-pollinated. The only way to establish buffers is to know where GMO crops are being grown, and that's apparently the rub.

The Associated Press carried a story indicating some seed associations around the nation are carrying out mapping, with varying levels of support from biotech companies. But AP reports the mapping is voluntary and spotty. The information is only shared among fellow growers to avoid what biotech companies warn could be a map for agricultural vigilantes bent on crop sabotage.

Robert Purdy, who grows genetically engineered sugar beets in the Willamette Valley on mapped farmland, agrees. "If mapping were made public," he told AP, "nothing could stop people from pulling out those sugar beet plants." 

Organic farmers, whose livelihood depends on crop purity, or at least the perception of purity, say mapping made public is crucial to successful co-existence. "Mapping would bring transparency to a system that's extremely opaque," according to the Portland-based Center for Food Safety.

Click to read more ...

Monday
Jun092014

Hats and Cattle, Saddles and Horses

Clever political campaign phrases with a bite have been known to influence elections. It's possible a clever catch phrase will have an impact on the 2014 Oregon gubernatorial election.

Walter Mondale turned the popular advertising slogan of his day — "Where's the beef?" — into a political jab at Democratic presidential primary rival Gary Hart. The question halted Hart's momentum and helped Mondale earn his party's nomination in 1984.

Lloyd Bentsen skewered Dan Quayle in their 1988 vice presidential debate after the Indiana senator likened his political experience to that of former President John F. Kennedy. Bentsen replied, "I served with Jack Kennedy. I knew Jack Kennedy. Jack Kennedy was a friend of mine. Senator, you're no Jack Kennedy." Bentsen won the debate and even though Quayle became vice president, he never factored seriously into GOP presidential politics again.

Ross Perot, running as an independent for President, struck a nerve when he said, "I don't have any experience in running up a $4 trillion debt." An exasperated Perot struck a different kind of nerve later when he would screech, "Let me finish!" Comedian Dana Carvey never let the phrase die a graceful death as Perot's popularity plummeted.

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
May212014

A Ho-Hum Election with Interesting Implications

In an election overshadowed by a court ruling outlawing same-sex marriage discrimination, only three out of 10 Oregonians bothered to fill out and send in ballots. For Democrats, it was a ho-hum primary, but for Republicans, it was a battle for what some called "the soul of the GOP."

Little unexpected occurred at the state level, but there were some dramatic and interesting decisions at the local level. Clackamas County voters retained two commissioners facing a challenge, Multnomah County voters overwhelmingly elected a new chair and commissioner. Washington County voters returned three incumbent commissioners, including two who faced vigorous challengers from the political left.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
May062014

Kitzhaber to the Rescue — Again

John Kitzhaber has some notable political advantages heading into his re-election this fall to an unprecedented fourth term. Now he has added rescuing a woman in distress.

As first reported by KGW-TV, Kitzhaber was on his way to dinner in Portland, saw a woman lying on a sidewalk and ordered his driver to pull over. The former emergency room doctor administered CPR to the unconscious woman and ordered his driver to call for paramedics who arrived minutes later and used a defibrillator to restart the woman's heart.

The unidentified woman was taken to OHSU and is reportedly out of serious danger, the Portland Fire Bureau told The Oregonian. Emergency responders credited Kitzhaber with possibly saving the woman's life. The first six minutes after someone's heart stops are critical to their survival, emergency personnel said.

The paramedic who worked alongside Kitzhaber said it was "pretty neat" to see the governor calmly aiding the woman. He said it was surprising to be working with a governor on a rescue mission.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Apr292014

Kitzhaber Keeps Pressing Health Care Reforms

Governor Kitzhaber and Kaiser CEO Bernard Tyson agree the health care business model is broken and one major reason why is the separation of care for physical and mental illnesses.

Appearing together at the Portland Business Alliance's annual breakfast, Kitzhaber and Tyson stressed the need to move from a "volume-driven" approach to a model that offers better care at more affordable prices.

The Portland Business Journal quoted Tyson as saying, "There is a mental health challenge we're working on, how to reattach the head to the body." Tyson said physical and mental illness is treated in separate locations, using separate records, even though 45 percent of physical health visits indicate a need for mental health services.

Tyson also said fee-for-service medicine needs to be "thrown out the window."

Kitzhaber touted the benefits being achieved through coordinated care organizations, which he credited for shrinking annual cost increases in care from 5.4 percent to 3.4 percent. The governor noted the 16 current CCOs care for 900,000 lower income Oregonians and are engaged in integrating physical, mental and dental care. He said he next wants to expand CCO cover to public employees and teachers and ultimately to the entire health insurance market.

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Jan222014

Large House Turnover Looms for 2015 Session

The 2015 Oregon House will be a substantially different from the one that convened just a year ago. Nearly a quarter of House members who were sworn in during the 2013 session have announced their intention not to seek re-election or are pursuing other electoral opportunities (some in the Oregon Senate).

In a state where relationships are key to legislative victories, the turnover in the House may break Oregon’s recent streak in passing major reforms.

The 14 House members not seeking re-election include nine Republicans and five Democrats. Together, they have served a whopping 117 years as elected members of the Oregon House through 103 regular sessions (and, for some, countless special sessions).

Rep. Bob Jenson (R-Pendleton), the longest serving member of the Oregon House, is among those who will retire this year after serving 18 years as a state representative.

Legislative service is a tough business — long hours, low pay, months away from families and friends, all combined with an election cycle that is increasingly hostile. Yet, the service for many is rewarding, finding ways to pass legislation that is important to their districts, working collaboratively balance budgets and make important reforms.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Dec172013

Oregon’s Holiday Wish List

Like children, policymakers in Oregon make out holiday wish lists. Here are some the wishes we think are on the list.Children across Oregon are preparing their lists for Santa ahead of the holiday next week. Legislators and the governor, in preparation for the February session and election year ,are developing their own wish lists — none of which are likely to stop with “my two front teeth.”

Here are a few items that may find their way onto policymaker wish lists this holiday season:

Money for the General Fund

A perennial wish for almost all policymakers is additional money to spend in the upcoming session. Each member has his/her policy priority and nearly every one comes with an additional resource request. Despite increased revenues from the special session, legislators will arrive in February to find few uncommitted dollars available for their shiny priorities. Legislators and the governor will be awaiting the revenue forecast with the same anticipation of children on Christmas Eve.

Click to read more ...