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Entries in job creation (3)

Tuesday
Dec032013

Business Leaders Tackle Persistent Poverty

Oregon's poverty rate has continued to club even after the end of the last recession. Oregon business leaders will discuss how to meet their goal of reducing poverty sharply in the next six years.Oregon business leaders will gather a week from now and focus on a very untypical business topic — how to reduce Oregon's poverty level.

The Oregon Business Plan calls for reducing the level of poverty in the state from 17.2 percent to less than 10 percent by 2020. Sounds good, but how? And why do business leaders care?

The answer stretches over several subjects — ensuring a trained, available workforce, restoring economic prosperity to rural communities and making Oregon an appealing place for outside investors. After all, who wants to invest in a state that some call the Appalachia of the West?

Leadership summits often hover at the grasstops of problematic issues, but this year the Oregon Business planners are definitely getting into the thick weeds. After the obligatory morning sessions about success stories, the afternoon sessions dive into subjects such how to connect workforce training with actual careers, grow profitable minority and women-owned small businesses, finance public works that make communities ready for new development and tap the natural resources key to returning rural economic health.

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Thursday
Apr262012

Making State Jobs Programs Do the Job

Legislators of both political parties and from all parts of Oregon agreed the state can play a more significant role in job creation by making its far-flung economic development efforts more agile and coordinated.

With nearly unanimous support in their short 2012 session, lawmakers approved House 4040, which the Eugene Register-Guard said "could prove to be the most far-reaching jobs bill that emerged from the legislative session."

The genesis of the Oregon Investment Act stands in stark contrast to the bickering and posturing in Congress as it debates how to stimulate the still-sluggish U.S. economy.  The act also provided a way for legislators here to surmount their usual differences over the appropriate government role in economic development.

To get behind the scenes, I asked Rep. Tobias Read to recount how the measure came about. Here's what he said:

"After he was elected, Governor Kitzhaber and his team asked Treasurer Ted Wheeler, Business Development Commission Chair Wally Van Valkenburg and me to serve as something of an economic development transition team. We had a lot of help from Scott Nelson (Governor's office), Tim McCabe (Business Oregon director), Paul Grove (Business Oregon legislative coordinator) and others as we worked quickly to put together some recommendations. We also recognized that there was far more work than could be done in the short time between his election and his inauguration, so, as we delivered our recommendations, we asked for the opportunity to continue working.  

"We got permission, and spent some time learning about strategies from other states and countries, and then went on the road to talk with people about what businesses in Oregon needed to expand and hire.

"We heard different versions of the same story around the state. The consistent theme was that businesses couldn't get access to the capital they needed to expand.  Furthermore, people felt that Oregon's programs are scattered across agencies, difficult to find, and too rigid.

"We recognized that we couldn't solve all these problems in the short session, or in the time that led up to it, so the Investment Act (House Bill 4040) is really enabling legislation that creates the Growth Board to build a plan to address all these issues — and to make policy recommendations to set the stage for substantive changes next session.  We made clear that we were interested in establishing priorities, promoting flexibility, achieving coordination, and gaining the leverage that comes from attracting new private-sector dollars into the Oregon economy.  

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Wednesday
Mar142012

Contrasting Views on Jobs Legislation

The Oregonian headline tells the story: "Congratulations and complaints."  Congratulations for handling the big issues of health, education and early learning reform. Complaints about the failure of a number of jobs bills.

Issues directly related to Oregon's economy tended to take a back seat during the short session in Salem, notwithstanding claims to the contrary in various post-session communications by legislators to their constituents.

In floor speeches on the Health Insurance Exchange (House Bill 4164), achievement compacts for school districts (Senate Bill 1581) and health care transformation (Senate Bill 1580), Democrats painted a picture of those major reforms mattering to small businesses in Oregon. Major business associations supported all of the reforms, but it is not clear that any of the bills will create jobs on their own. 

Democratic leaders said as health care costs go down, businesses will have more money to invest in creating jobs. Legislators on both sides of the political aisle and Governor Kitzhaber deserve credit for taking on big issues such as health and education reform.  

House Democratic Leader Tina Kotek, D-Portland, continued that theme in a piece in the Statesman-Journal, "We promised to give businesses the tools they need to grow and hire, stand up for middle-class Oregonians and prioritize the essential services Oregonians need most. Now that the dust has settled after last week's adjournment, I am happy to report that we delivered on those promises."

Republicans pointed out what was left on the cutting room floor during the legislative session and pointed the finger at Democratic opposition.

“With 190,000 unemployed Oregonians, the legislature’s inaction on jobs and the economy is inexcusable,” said House Republican Leader Kevin Cameron, R-Salem. “Nonetheless, House Republicans continued to work with the Governor and legislative Democrats to find common ground on other issues. We’ll continue to provide lea

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