Fragments From a Fractious Political Fracas

The widow of the late Democratic Senator Alan Bates said he valued the high road over the low road in politics as she called out the Democrat seeking to succeed him for running negative advertising.

The widow of the late Democratic Senator Alan Bates said he valued the high road over the low road in politics as she called out the Democrat seeking to succeed him for running negative advertising.

With the 2016 election less than two weeks away, here are some news updates:

A re-emergent John Kitzhaber shared on Facebook his opposition to Measure 97. His revelation earned him sharp rebukes from Measure 97 backers who accused the former governor of failing to achieve a durable grand bargain that generated adequate state revenue and taxpayer equity. For his part, Kitzhaber said more revenue is needed and corporations should pay it, but Measure 97 wasn’t the way to do it…

Willamette Week’s Nigel Jaquiss reports that Oregon Democrats have cast more ballots in early voting than Republicans, reversing a historical pattern. It is tempting to speculate Republicans aren’t rushing to the polls because of reservations about the guy at the top of the GOP ballot. Democrats may suggest an early voting surge reflects enthusiasm for Hillary Clinton. Of course, it may just be a short-term anomaly….

The wife of the late Senator Alan Bates, a Democrat, chastised the Democratic candidate to succeed him for airing negative ads against her Republican opponent. Laurie Bates, in a guest column appearing the Medford Mail Tribune, cited the adage, :how you run for office reflects how you will serve in office.” She said her late husband “modeled that belief” and “would rather lose on the high ground the win on the low ground.” The Republican candidate has limited campaign contributions and refused negative advertising. That isn’t expected to help his long-shot candidacy, despite praise from Mrs. Bates….

The Oregon governor’s race between Kate Brown and Bud Pierce is either a walk-over for Brown or neck-and-neck. Take your pick based on recent polls with disparate results. Different public opinion polling methodologies can account for some variation, but these polls are, as they say, miles apart. Polling more consistently has predicted a tight race between Democrat Brad Avakian and Republican Dennis Richardson for Oregon secretary of state. Richardson has captured many top newspaper endorsements amid questions about some of Avakian’s positions, including voter registration through election day. As a result, Republicans appear to have their best shot in years to capture a statewide elected post….

Attorney General Ellen Rosenbaum is a shoe-in for re-election, but finds herself with an awkward lawsuit filed by her civil rights director alleging racial discrimination….

Pew Research reports voters are pessimistic about the ability of either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump to heal wounds inflicted during a brass-knuckles 2016 presidential campaign or to bridge deep political divisions that have stymied the federal government over the past eight years. Two-thirds of Clinton supporters doubt political divisions will subside if she is elected, and 25 percent expect divisions to deepen. Almost half of Trump supports anticipate any change in the toxic political atmosphere in Washington, DC, which suggests the election may not end the fractious campaign.