Pinterest Idea Boards Offer Distinctive Platform for Thought Leadership

 Yes, Pinterest boards are filled with recipes, travel destinations and cool photographs, but they also can be used for thought leadership such as curating the insights and bright ideas from a major conference or extended event.

Yes, Pinterest boards are filled with recipes, travel destinations and cool photographs, but they also can be used for thought leadership such as curating the insights and bright ideas from a major conference or extended event.

Have you ever attended a conference, speech or major event and wished you could share the nuggets of wisdom you gained? Pinterest has an idea for you.

Actually, Pinterest has an idea board for you.

Sporting events or unfolding election results lend themselves to a series of tweets. A single aha moment from a speech can form a solid foundation for a blog post. A funny episode or clever display makes for a popular Facebook or Instagram post. But Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and blogs aren’t as accommodating to a group of insights.

Jessica Lawlor, writing for ragan.com, points out that most Pinterest users aren’t there to interact with friends and families. They are looking for ideas and tips. Recipes, travel destinations and cool photographs are common, but any kind of content with a long shelf life works well.

Pinterest can provide a visual scrapbook for ideas gathered at a conference or extended event. The idea board can serve as a handy reference tool both for the person pinning as well as for their followers and event sponsors. The idea board, with a wide range of interesting notes in the form of pins, can become a useful tactic in demonstrating thought leadership.

Since note-taking is a modern-day lost art, curating the high points and breath-through moments from events or conferences can be a real value. Pinterest’s board concept is a perfect platform for this kind of content.

In fact, Pinterest has improved its suitability for this kind of content with what it calls group boards, which allow others to add their pins, enriching the overall value of the content and enticing more followers. You also can pin media coverage of the event. Group boards work best with engagement, so it is smart to promote the group board, starting with other conference or event attendees and extending to your associates with an interest in the subject matter.

Another value of Pinterest is its visual orientation. With photos, videos and graphs, Pinterest is great for showing what you mean, which can transform dry conference presentations into lively, visually appealing content.

Pinterest is measurably different than other leading social media platforms, but some of the same rules apply. Original, relevant content counts. Keywords matter. Engagement, through repining and following, is king. Your Pinterest boards need to fit into a thoughtful strategy and connect with your website.

With that in mind, idea boards can be a distinctive way for you to exercise your thought leadership, even for the menial task of taking notes to capture someone else’s bright ideas.

 

UO Project Plumbs Low Trust in Media and How to Restore It

 Two University of Oregon journalism professors conducted four workshops to ask how the news media could earn back public trust that has been steadily declining. They found people want facts separated from opinions, less focus on breaking news and a commitment to news coverage about what’s working and what isn’t.

Two University of Oregon journalism professors conducted four workshops to ask how the news media could earn back public trust that has been steadily declining. They found people want facts separated from opinions, less focus on breaking news and a commitment to news coverage about what’s working and what isn’t.

Trust in US news media is slipping, prompting a pair of University of Oregon journalism professors to set out to find why and how trust could be restored. Their research produced insights such as, “Journalism is a relationship, not a product.”

Launched in July 2017 and called the 32 Percent Project in reference to low new media trust levels record by a Gallup survey, the researchers conducted four workshops (three of them in public libraries) in various parts of the country, engaging more than 50 people in extended conversations about trust and the news media. They quickly moved from asking whether people trusted news media to how news media could earn their trust.

Researchers Lisa Heyamoto and Todd Milbourn gleaned, “People demand that the news earn their trust with authenticity, transparency and real diversity. They want news that is consistently presented and focused on what’s working as well as what isn’t. They hunger for news that reflects a sense of community.”

“Only some of the public’s beliefs about media and information fit easily with journalistic concepts of objectivity, neutrality and the like. Rather than demanding that journalists remain at a cool remove, many participants in these conversations said they want news that digs into the complex realities of their communities with both a critical eye and a shared sense of mission.,” explained Regina Lawrence and Andrew DeVigal with the Agora Journalism Center that funded the research project.

Heyamoto and Milbourn noted participants questioned the integrity of an advertising-based media model and disparaged constant streamers about “Breaking News.”

 An analysis of comments and viewpoints distilled into six key findings that would enable the news media to earn back the trust it has lost and continues to lose.

An analysis of comments and viewpoints distilled into six key findings that would enable the news media to earn back the trust it has lost and continues to lose.

The report centers on six key findings, which Heyamoto and Milbourn cast as “conditions of trust” – Authenticity, transparency, consistency, positivity, diversity and shared mission. Here are some excerpts from the report:

Authenticity: “One of the most consistent themes – one that spanned geography, education level and political affiliation – was the idea that news organizations could build trust if they were more comfortable not just sharing what they know, but [also] explaining what they don’t.”

“I’ll trust a news organization when they use at least three sources to verify and when they admit they may not know the entire story yet.”

Transparency: “Participants in each workshop expressed frustration that journalistic stories seem to contain a blend of fact, analysis and even opinion. Time and again, they said they wanted a much clearer separation, as well as obvious and straightforward labeling to help them distinguish between fact and opinion.”

"I’ll trust a news organization when [journalists] open the studios for a tour and [we] see how you get the news.”

Consistency. “In an age when many people’s news feeds are a chaotic mix of information and entertainment, several participants in Boston said they appreciate news organizations that deploy a standardized, consistent article format. While they enjoy a diversity of content, they said it’s important to know what to expect from an organization when clicking on a particular article. “

Several participants expressed a desire for news organizations to clearly and consistently separate breaking news from other content.

Positivity. “Participants spoke of positivity not just in terms of news content, but in terms of style and presentation. Participants in Pico Rivera (California), Oxford (Mississippi) and Vienna (Illinois), described what they viewed as ‘shouting matches’ on cable news, lamenting what they perceived to be sensationalism and conflict prioritization. As one participant in Pico Rivera put it: ‘You’ve got the three on the right and these three on the left screaming at each other. You can’t even watch that anymore.’”

“Trump called them ‘fake media’ and when it comes down to my community, you all look the same to me. When there is something good going in my neighborhood, I don’t see it. Never. But if somebody shoots somebody, oh, first page.” 

Diversity: “Participants were clear in every community: they said they will not trust a news organization that doesn’t pay sincere and holistic attention to diversity. Across all four communities, participants said they did not see themselves or their lives reflected in the news they consumed,  and expressed an emphatic desire for that to change.”

“I’ll trust a news organization when they are intersectional. They are fair. They don’t promote stereotypes. They show and represent people who look like me. They prioritize mental health.” 

Shared mission. “News organizations have historically functioned as both mirror and mouthpiece of a community. Yet participants in each workshop said they felt that relationship had frayed. They said they did not feel the news organizations they encountered were working for them, or with them. They said they wanted to know that journalists were part of the community, were invested in its success and were genuinely interested in maintaining relationships with their neighbors.” 

"I’ll trust a news organization when I know it truly cares about the community it serves.”

“Building trust is critical for the future of journalism and democracy,” Milbourn says. “But you can’t effectively build trust until you understand what drives and disrupts it. That’s what this project is all about — developing a deeper understanding of those dynamics.”

High Rate of Opioid Prescriptions Correlates to Low Labor Participation

 For the first time since data has been collected, there are more US jobs open than workers on the street to fill them. A Princeton economist pins part of the blame on lower labor participation in areas where opioid prescriptions are highest, suggesting the opioid crisis is both a health care and economic problem.

For the first time since data has been collected, there are more US jobs open than workers on the street to fill them. A Princeton economist pins part of the blame on lower labor participation in areas where opioid prescriptions are highest, suggesting the opioid crisis is both a health care and economic problem.

Workforce participation among prime-age (25-54) US workers lags behind most other developed countries and a Princeton economist puts part of the blame on over-prescription of opioids.

Alan Krueger, the former chair of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers, analyzed labor force participation county-by-county across the nation from 1999 to 2015. His most stunning finding is a strong correlation between high opioid prescription rates and low labor force participation.

In an interview on NPR’s Here & Now, Krueger said his research showed opioid prescription rates in the highest 10 percent of counties were 30 times larger than in the 10 percent of counties with the lowest prescription rates. Differences in mixes of industry and underlying health conditions in various parts of the country could not account for such a stark disparity in opioid prescription rates. 

Krueger concluded that high opioid use and addiction is a contributing factor to counties with the biggest drop in labor participation since the Great Recession and chronic low labor force participation. Not all of the counties with high opioid prescription rates and low labor participation are economically distressed, he noted.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has reported the rate of US labor force participation is second lowest among developed nations, exceeding only Italy, which has been in a perpetual recession for years. The situation in the United States has reached a dubious milestone where more jobs (6.7 million) are now available than people looking for work. “The opioid crisis,” Krueger says, “has compounded the problem.”

Krueger explained persistent opioid use can affect worker motivation, diminish the ability to concentrate at work and lead to failed drug tests. He said his interviews with workers as part of his research indicated a majority take opioids for chronic pain unrelated to their work life.

Even if there wasn’t a correlation between opioid prescription rates and low labor participation, Krueger said there is a crisis. With just 5 percent of the world’s population, the United States consumes 80 percent of all opioid prescriptions, and 35,000 Americans die annually from opioid overdoses.

Curbing opioid prescriptions is usually viewed through the lens of health care, which Krueger says justifies a greater emphasis on preventive care and alternative chronic pain strategies. But his research suggests the opioid crisis is exacting a price on local economies. To grow or regain economic vitality, communities need new investment. It can be hard to attract that new investment when there isn’t a very large pool of available workers and the workers who are available don’t have the right training. Add in a high rate of opioid use and the investor may head for the nearest door.

 

Survey Shows Medicaid is Popular, If Sometimes Confusing

 A national survey found Medicaid, despite its lower profile than Medicare, is popular and widely recognized for providing health care access to some of America’s most vulnerable citizens from low-income families to elderly adults ibn long-term care facilities.

A national survey found Medicaid, despite its lower profile than Medicare, is popular and widely recognized for providing health care access to some of America’s most vulnerable citizens from low-income families to elderly adults ibn long-term care facilities.

A national survey commissioned by Providence St. Joseph Health shows a strong majority of respondents know about and value Medicaid, which provides health insurance to low-income Americans and pays for long-term care and in-home care for elderly and disabled persons.

Medicaid was signed into law along with Medicare in 1965. Medicaid remained largely in the political shadows until its expansion became a key part of the Affordable Care Act’s goal of moving closer to universal health insurance coverage in America.

The Providence St. Joseph Health survey found 87 percent of respondents were aware of Medicaid, though some were confused about what it covers. More than half of respondents said they, a friend or a loved one were covered by Medicaid. Seventy-seven percent of respondents said Medicaid is very important to maintain broad access to health care.

Today, one in five Americans is covered by Medicaid, making it the nation’s largest health insurance plan. Medicaid covers nearly half of all babies born in America and 60 percent of elderly persons in nursing homes. Medicaid also provides health benefits to military veterans and people dealing with opioid addiction and mental health issues.

“In other words, these are our children, parents, grandparents, neighbors, friends and colleagues,” Providence St. Joseph health wrote in a blog about the survey. “To make matters even more confusing, many Americans may be covered by Medicaid and not even realize it because the program goes by different names in different states.” The Oregon Health Plan is the name for Oregon’s Medicaid program. In Washington, Medicaid is called Apple Health.

GOP congressional efforts to reduce the federal budget deficit have zeroed in on Medicaid and particularly federal funds that go to states to pay for expanding eligibility to Medicaid. The Trump administration is pushing to impose work requirements on Medicaid recipients capable of working, though critics say this could penalize low-income workers with jobs that have uncertain schedules and  irregular hours.

There have been Medicaid-related controversies at the state level. Oregon removed nearly 55,000 Medicaid recipients who were enrolled, but later were found ineligible under the expanded program. Oregon also determined that coordinated care organizations (CCOs) were overpaid $41 million in Medicaid benefits. Fifteen CCOs were created statewide to coordinate the delivery of services to 1 million Oregonians.  

“Medicaid has served as a vital safety net since it was signed into law in 1965, along with Medicare, as part of the Social Security Act,” according to Providence St. Joseph Health. “There’s plenty of room to improve the program, and Providence St. Joseph Health is pursuing innovative ways to provide the best care in the right setting for this population. At the same time, it’s important for everyone to know what this program does and who it covers, because it affects so many of us.”

[NOTE: Providence Health & Services and Providence St. Joseph Health are long-time CFM clients.]

 

Take a Break and Consume Some Hopeful News

 If you are discouraged by the continuous torrent of bad news, check out stories written from the perspective of solutions journalism. They can be informative and inspirational, restoring some semblance of hope that serious social problems are being addressed and conquered.

If you are discouraged by the continuous torrent of bad news, check out stories written from the perspective of solutions journalism. They can be informative and inspirational, restoring some semblance of hope that serious social problems are being addressed and conquered.

What people believe is largely determined by the information they consume.

People are bombarded with a wide range of information on TV, the internet and grocery checkout aisles. They also receive information from friends, coworkers and the clergy.

The blizzard of information we experience seems oddly inconsistent with proclamations we now live in a post-truth era, increasingly influenced by fake news – and claims of fake news. In the past, we had differing points of view; now we face a fundamental disagreement on basic facts – from the size of a crowd to signs of perilous climate change.

This state of affairs has led many in the news media to reflect on their performance. Have media outlets surrendered objectivity to reinforcing partisan perspectives? Are ratings and clicks driving news agendas? Will shrunken news staffs focus on “breaking news” at the expense of more time-consuming trend stories and investigative reports?

Allison Frost, a senior producer for Oregon Public Broadcasting, has asked an even more probing question – is there a role for journalists to point out solutions to serious and often chronic problems? In her piece posted on Medium and titled, “I practice solutions journalism,” Frost says the answer is yes.

I practice solutions journalism because: Our job as journalists is to cover what’s happening in the world, and we are largely only covering the things that are falling apart, broken, murderous, horrific,” Frost writes. “Those things are true, they are. But there are other things that are also true.”

Those ‘other things’ include covering “the people who are envisioning and contributing to solving problems.” “We’re socially and biologically programmed to attend to problems, but we need to attend to the responses to those problems in order to solve these problems – as community, as a state, a country, a planet,” according to Frost.

The news media, Frost believes, can help by telling the stories of problem-solvers. “If we don’t cover what’s possible, the alternatives and responses to the daily conflict, death and destruction, who will?”

Stories about problem-solvers and solutions can at once be informative and inspirational. They can be an antidote to alienation and frustration. They can be a respite from an unremitting series of stories about mass shootings, public corruption and persistent poverty. “I do not kid myself,” Frost admits, “that the problems will all go away and there will be no more problems or conflicts to cover.”

As pessimism feeds on itself, so does hope. Solutions journalism is one way the news media can break out of its cycle of bad news and publish stories that fuel some optimism.

Frost included in her post a link to the Solutions Story Tracker™, which features almost 3,400 solutions journalism stories reporting on responses to social problems. They were produced by more than 600 separate news outlets from 135 countries. The database continues to grow. If you despair from all that bad news, check out the Story Tracker and realize there are people trying to make things better.