Storytelling as Your Elevator Speech

You have 30 seconds or less to deliver your elevator speech. The best strategy may be a short story that connects what you do with your listener.You need to be able to make your pitch in 30 seconds. Just as important, your elevator speech needs to focus on why what you do is important to your customers or clients. 

The elevator speech has taken on added importance as more people realize you have only one, fast-moving moment to make a memorable first impression.

But the last thing you want is a first impression just about you. That first impression needs to center on how your work uniquely benefits your customers or clients.

This difference parallels the evolution from advertising to content marketing. Instead of shouting a message, you deliver useful, relevant information. The elevator speech, in its slim 30-second format, needs to follow the same pattern. Don't shout, solve a problem.

So instead of rattling off your list of services or products, your elevator speech should focus on a simple story about how you helped a client or customer. You only have 30 seconds, so offer just enough detail to showcase your value.

People have a hard time remembering lists of things or key messages without a lot of repetition. They can and do retain the essence of a good story. And stories are a tried-and-true way for people to absorb complex information, put it into context and coat it with a positive feeling.

Staff meetings and marketing retreats often stress the need for a solid elevator speech that everyone in an organization can use to underline a brand promise or identity. Too often, the elevator speech exercise in a staff meeting or retreat is just that — an exercise, not a new habit.

Rarely can a group write concise prose that conforms to the way different people actually talk. And elevator speeches need to be more than a glib tagline. A story with the right stuff can be told in various ways to the same effect. It is a perfect answer for a widely accepted and commonly used "elevator speech" in your organization.

The story-as-elevator-speech example can breed more involvement on overall content marketing efforts. It can develop the habit of telling stories, which requires first looking for them.

And if you look for stories, you are bound to be more observant in what your customers or clients need and how you help them meet that need. The elevator speech creates the motivation for your staff to become content creators — by what they do, not just what they write.