Vlogging to Boost Your Brand Persona

NASCAR driver Brennan Poole has strengthened his brand persona through weekly vlogging that brings his viewers along for the ride.

NASCAR driver Brennan Poole has strengthened his brand persona through weekly vlogging that brings his viewers along for the ride.

People scared of shooting video would be petrified of vlogging. However, the discipline of taking video everyday may erase self doubts and fears of self absorption while creating a brand-building source of content.

In a piece appearing in Inc., NASCAR driver Brennan Poole describes how he became attracted to vlogging and offers tips on how anyone can do it.

“At first, it was really awkward and weird and I wasn’t capturing a lot of interesting things,” Poole said. “Now I’m more comfortable. I don’t care as much that people are watching me walking around with a camera. I started not to care as much because I care more about getting the content.

Poole said the positive feedback loop from a growing number of viewers motivates him to keep going and getting better.

A key to getting better is having a schedule. “We try to put out videos every Friday so over the race weekend people can watch them,” he explains. “Every other week, I post a funny video just to have extra content. The following week, I post the vlog from the previous two weeks.”

Another tip is having a good, easy-to-operate camera. But capturing video on a smartphone works, too. “You can capture almost everything with your phone” because it is almost always accessible, Poole says.

Granted, Poole has the built-in advantage of being surrounded by a lot of noisy, fast, cool stuff. But Poole peppers his vlog with more commonplace fare, such as filming his favorite restaurants on the NASCAR circuit. He also chronicles how he strives to become a better race car driver. “Race fans enjoy that look at the sport, but it’s also fun for me,” Poole says.

Talking about video quickly gets around to the length of clips. For his vlogs, Poole says he tries to keep them under 10 minutes, but will go longer if the footage merits it.

“The key is to spend as much time as you can focusing on content, not on production,” Poole advises. “Ultimately the content is everything. Do that and soul’ll build an audience. No matter how technically great a video is, if it’s boring, who wants to watch it.”

The secret to capturing good video is being aware of interesting things going on around you and not being shy about whipping out your camera. It may seem strange at first, but with experience and a growing audience of viewers, it will soon become second-hand. Like Poole, you can bring your followers along for the ride.