Dancing with Truth and Consequences

U.S. Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte wants to move on from his fractured hold-up story in Rio to ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars” without dancing with the consequences of his cover-up lie.

U.S. Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte wants to move on from his fractured hold-up story in Rio to ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars” without dancing with the consequences of his cover-up lie.

The brand known as Ryan Lochte is broken. An apology isn’t enough to glue the legs back on his brand.

In another televised interview, Lochte admitted to lying about an armed hold-up at a Rio de Janeiro gas station that he and three other U.S. Olympic swimmers apparently vandalized when drunk. Apologies work when someone makes a mistake and owns it. They don’t settle the score when you make a mistake and try to cover it up.

For reasons that are hard to understand, Lochte continues to use the odd phrase “over-exaggerated” the truth. He didn’t exaggerate the truth. He lied.

Lochte blames the news media for fanning the flames and dragging out the story. He says, “I have a great team. They are dealing with it, all the legal issues. We’re just trying to get this over with. It’s been dragged out way too long. The media has taken this to a whole new level. I want to put this behind me and move on and move forward.”

Lochte adds, “There are other, bigger issues that this world is facing. I am human. I made a mistake, and that’s something I am going to have to live with.”

Yes, the world has bigger problems than Lochte. And, yes, he will have to live with his mistake. But if he wants his brand to shine again, he needs to redeem himself, less for the deed, than the cover-up and his continued whining.

Lochte already is pitching for his appearance on “Dancing With the Stars,” which appears on ABC, the same network that carries Good Morning America, where Lochte made his latest attempt at a cleansing apology.

If Lochte really wants redemption and to show he has a spine, not just swim fins, he might consider returning to Rio to face the criminal charges that have been filed against him. Would it be risky and could he face actual jail time? You bet. It would also show he is a grown up prepared to accept the consequences of his actions. Maybe he could agree to community service, working with young Brazilians who want to become world-class swimmers, but wouldn’t have an opportunity to learn from a world-class swimmer.

Showing respect for Brazil, its people and its laws would make Lochte respectable again as a brand. His actions would speak louder than his poor choice of words and his pathetic attempt to deflect blame for his misery on the media.

Acting like an adult might be inconvenient for Lochte. It might force him to miss his dance date on a TV show. That’s the price you have to pay for bad behavior. It's also the price you have to pay to redeem your brand, and perhaps even your own self-respect.

Gary Conkling is president and co-founder of CFM Strategic Communications, and he leads the firm's PR practice, specializing in crisis communications. He is a former journalist, who later worked on Capitol Hill and represented a major Oregon company. But most importantly, he’s a die-hard Ducks fan. You can reach Gary at garyc@cfmpdx.com and you can follow him on Twitter at @GaryConkling.