Shooting the Moon on Your Cell Phone

The maker of a clip-on zoom lens for cell phones demonstrates the power of show-me communications that tells a complete story in a single image.

The maker of a clip-on zoom lens for cell phones demonstrates the power of show-me communications that tells a complete story in a single image.

In the world of visual communications, there is nothing better than showing what you mean. The maker of a clip-on HD360x zoom lens for cell phones provides a great example.

In a single picture, the manufacturer shows how the zoom lens works, where it goes on a cell phone with a built-in camera and what images it can produce.

Of course, the picture doesn’t answer the question of lens quality, price or availability. But the picture makes you want to look to find out.

When viewers click on hd360x.com, they are greeted by a quick-paced slide show that reinforces the “pictures tell the story” theme by showing what the lens can do (including doubling as a monocular) and providing key specifications.

An ad about a camera lens is a no-brainer for “show me” visual communications, but so are many other messages. Fast food chains zero in on their menu items. Car companies put viewers in the driver’s seat. Computer makers dazzle showing what their laptops and tablets can do.

At their best, visual communications demonstrate a solution to a problem. The makers of the HD360x zoom lens, for example, solve the problem of shooting far away subjects on your cell phone without toting around a separate DSLR camera.

The HD360x image also shows the relative simplicity of how the product works. You snap on the lens pretty much like a clip for an open bag of potato chips. Who hasn’t mastered that skill?

Most important, the image is eye candy. You can’t miss it and you can’t take your eyes off it.

Words still have a place in paid media, but powerful images that show, explain and satisfy to the eye are a dominant way of showing your value proposition in an instant. If you don’t try to find a visual to tell your story, you miss out on your own best punch line.

Another great example of an eye-popping visual story of ironworkers sitting atop a tall tower with the simple explanation: “Building America."

Holiday Season Ripe for Building Brand Loyalty

Subaru is a good example of a company that leverages its good works into brand loyalty. And the holiday season, when families are gathering and people are reflecting, is a perfect moment for such advertising.

Subaru is a good example of a company that leverages its good works into brand loyalty. And the holiday season, when families are gathering and people are reflecting, is a perfect moment for such advertising.

Black Friday sales started early this season, but companies that have announced Thanksgiving Day closures may have achieved more branding success.

Transactions are important. So is customer trust and loyalty. It’s possible to compete for sales and send meaningful messages.

The holiday season is a time when families gather and many people reflect on their lives. It is the rarest of moments during the year when companies can tap into a deeper conversation with consumers.

Tapping into deeper conversations requires more than sending bottles of wine or marking down prices. It demands a more authentic expression of the brand and its promise. Possibilities include:

  • Sharing the voluntary good works the company and its employees have done.
  • Touting the achievements and contributions of company employees.
  • Showing how a product or service delivers public benefit as well as consumer value.

Care needs to be taken to avoid coming off as self-aggrandizing or schmaltzy. The idea is to create an affinity, not a brag sheet.

Subaru provides a good example. The car company routinely runs TV ads emphasizing how its vehicles reliably protect family members and young drivers in car accidents. During the holiday season, Subaru is focusing on its pilot project with the National Park Service to eliminate trash in national treasures such as Yosemite, Grand Teton and Denali.

The partnership isn’t new. It began in 2015 when Subaru said it would share its knowledge of zero landfall practices with the National Park Service. The pilot project made a lot of sense. The National Park Services is forced to dispose of 100 million pounds of trash annually, and that doesn’t count the garbage left behind at park concessions. Subaru is credited with establishing the first U.S. automotive assembly plant in Indiana that has been designated as a zero landfill site.

The National Parks Conservation Association, also part of the partnership, hopes to use the Subaru-backed pilot project as a way to educate park visitors to their environmental footprint and provide a basis for expanding the program to other parks. The 832-acre site also has been designated as a Backyard Wildlife Habitat by the National Wildlife Federation.

The scale of this partnership should be dissuade companies for looking for opportunities to build consumer trust and community goodwill. There is no better time to create a sense of community for a brand than the holiday season.

Gary Conkling is president and co-founder of CFM Strategic Communications, and he leads the firm's PR practice, specializing in crisis communications. He is a former journalist, who later worked on Capitol Hill and represented a major Oregon company. But most importantly, he’s a die-hard Ducks fan. You can reach Gary at garyc@cfmpdx.com and you can follow him on Twitter at@GaryConkling.

Don’t Catnap and Miss a Newsjacking Moment

Don’t be caught catnapping and miss a newsjacking moment than can turn into an earned media bonanza.

Don’t be caught catnapping and miss a newsjacking moment than can turn into an earned media bonanza.

A minor car robbery in Kansas turned into a national earned media bonanza for Kit Kat, providing yet another example of the prowess of newsjacking.

A thief broke into a Kansas State University student’s car after spotting an unopened Kit Kat candy bar in the cup holder. The thief left a handwritten note saying, “I love Kit Kats, so I checked your door and it was unlocked. Did not take anything other than the Kit Kat. I am sorry and hungry.”

The K-State student shared the thief’s note on Twitter, where it was spotted by Kit Kat, which jumped in with both paws. “Who steals someones Kit Kat?! WHO DOES THAT?! Shoot us a DM and we’ll replace it for you.”

Kit Kat, smartly, did more than replace the candy bar. It sent enough product to fill the student’s car, creating a perfectly shareable moment – and photo opp. It worked. National media and social media treated it like a good-news feature story.

The student’s tweet of the thief’s note attracted more than 500,000 shares, so there already was a crowd paying attention. Kit Kat jumped in with its donation to ride the story another mile with a shareable product promotion.

That’s the potency of newsjacking – you capitalize on the momentum of a trending story to add your chapter to the story. The Kit Kat example is a no-brainer. The product donation was peanuts compared to the cost of advertising to get the same number of impressions in a wide mix of media.

Newsjacking opportunities aren’t always this obvious or easy. They often require imagination and effort. Most important, they won’t unfold unless you look consistently and relentlessly for opportunities.

Newsjacking needs to be part of your media relations arsenal, given the same level of respect and attention as press releases, events, blogs, website updates and presentations.  And, you also have to escape your own echo chamber and pay attention to what’s trending in your world.

Don’t let someone steal your Kit Kat and catch you catnapping. 

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Gary Conkling is president and co-founder of CFM Strategic Communications, and he leads the firm's PR practice, specializing in crisis communications. He is a former journalist, who later worked on Capitol Hill and represented a major Oregon company. But most importantly, he’s a die-hard Ducks fan. You can reach Gary at garyc@cfmpdx.com and you can follow him on Twitter at@GaryConkling.

Earning Media Coverage Demands Daring, Creativity

Stale press releases won’t grab media attention as well as clever events, creative storytelling or compelling videos.

Stale press releases won’t grab media attention as well as clever events, creative storytelling or compelling videos.

Too many press releases sound like they were written a century ago and dispatched via telegraph. They quote the CEO and describe the obvious. They seem oblivious to news trends or trending news. Not surprisingly, they often wind up in waste cans.

The art of earned media – getting your brand, client or subject mentioned in news columns in print or online – requires just as much creativity as paid media and often more daring. Potential rewards are worth the effort.

Getting attention is the point of earned media. A stale press release may not do the trick as well as staging a clever event, posting a thought-provoking blog, sustaining an engaging social media site or hopping onto a trending news story with your own relevant content.

If your earned media strategy consists of sending press releases and hoping for the best, you are missing out on the high-speed train known as digital media. A press release is like a prayer that someone will reprint it as a story. Digital media lets you be the writer, editor and publisher of your own story and broadcast it as widely as your wits can manage.

Online visibility is a core value of earned media these days. Your link can be embedded in stories, shared or circulated in channels where your dream audiences hang out. That visibility can translate into clicks on your website, blog or social media platform. In turn, that builds awareness and, in time, trust.

Paid media and even traditional medial relations are about getting attention, too, but typically on different terms. You are ending a message you want people to hear and heed. Earned media is increasingly about providing information that people are eager to know and are willing to access if you make it available.

Because of the blizzard of information whipping around all of us, your earned media content needs to stand out to be seen. That’s where daring comes in. Sometimes the best strategy is to follow the lead of bank robbers and go where the money is – or, in this case, where your audience is. That’s why newsjacking has become a staple of earned media campaigns. Why go from a cold start when you can tap into the energy of a story that is already buzzing.

Another key contemporary earned media tactic is to send your content out in as many channels as you can, not just to the local newspaper. Actually, this isn’t as new as you might think. Cigarette companies pioneered the idea of putting your product message everywhere, from race cars to billboards to scenes in Hollywood movies. Pushing content through multiple channels, digital and non-digital, recognizes that your target audience is on the move and not always in the same place to hear what you have to say.

Celebrity endorsements are common on paid media, but true influencers shine through better in earned media content that allows them to share their experience in more relaxed, less pushy terms in video or online accompanied by images and other information.

Paid media buys must navigate highly segmented traditional media. Earned media campaigns are less constrained as they range across the digital and traditional media landscape. While paid media buys must be targeted because of financial limitations, earned media outreach can be much more expansive and experimental. The idea is to shoot wide, then narrow according to actual results.

Integrated communications strategies can and should involve both paid and earned media. Strategies saddled with smallish budgets may find the maximum impact through digital media, relying heavily on solid content. Good information, promoted through a network of digital media, social media and email, can be an attractive, budget-friendly, audience-engaging option.

Old Blogs with New Tricks

When your run dry of new ideas for your blog, thumb through your own portfolio of old blogs for fresh inspiration – and quite possibly a perfect repeat performance.

When your run dry of new ideas for your blog, thumb through your own portfolio of old blogs for fresh inspiration – and quite possibly a perfect repeat performance.

Old blog posts don’t have to be yesterday’s news. You can always repurpose evergreen content to publish as if it's something new.

Good blog content is timely and topical, which is what attracts clicks. But the advice contained in these blogs may live on and can form the basis for a new blog post or retrospective. In either case, the source for more material can certainly be your own old blog content.

Clever bloggers can think ahead and plan for a future use of their content, especially for that time when new ideas  are hard to come by or when an old blog suddenly becomes relevant all over again.

Another way to approach vintage blog content is to use it as a jumping off point for a new, related thought. Perhaps you’ve thought more about the advice you once gave and can expand on it. If have changed your mind on the subject, you can share the reasons why. Maybe you have more expertise or a new perspective now. 

Some subjects, like last year's food safety crisis at Chipotle, merit repeat coverage. You may have a product or a service with multiple aspects. You can write new blogs that highlight aspects you may have only briefly mentioned in previous blogs.

A new event might occasionally call for revisiting an old blog that was once more pertinent. Update it if you need to or re-post it if you don’t. Either way, make it clear you addressed the topic before – and your advice or service is still relevant.

A perfect trigger to resurrect archived blog content is in response to a customer question. Some may ask about a subject you’ve already covered, which gives you a chance to rework and update your thoughts in the form of an answer. You have the best of both worlds – responsiveness to a customer inquiry and credibility for having the answer already on the record.

Anticipating an emerging situation can be another terrific cause to revive an older blog that dealt with something similar. Think of your revived blog as a newsjacking opportunity.

Many content marketers and the organizations they serve complain about how hard it is to dream up material to write about. But maybe they should spend time thumbing through their own archives for new inspiration or old blogs that deserve another day in the sun.

You wouldn’t have to wonder where to look. Just pull up your own blog. Remember, old blogs can convey new tricks.

Gary Conkling is president and co-founder of CFM Strategic Communications, and he leads the firm's PR practice, specializing in crisis communications. He is a former journalist, who later worked on Capitol Hill and represented a major Oregon company. But most importantly, he’s a die-hard Ducks fan. You can reach Gary at garyc@cfmpdx.com and you can follow him on Twitter at@GaryConkling.

Indulgent Comments Can Swamp Key Messages

Donald Trump demonstrated how an indulgent comment can drown out everything else you say.

Donald Trump demonstrated how an indulgent comment can drown out everything else you say.

Donald Trump demonstrated in the third and final 2016 presidential debate how an indulgent comment can drown out everything else he said.

Playing coy on whether he would accept the outcome of the election if he loses wound up obscuring Trump's best overall debate performance and virtually assured his sharpest barbs at Hillary Clinton would be lost in the waves of subsequent news cycles.

Then he doubled down on his comment the following day by saying he would accept the election outcome – if he won.

This is a much more widespread affliction than a presidential candidate on the precipice of losing. CEOs too often let hubris get in the way of doing their job to deliver a crisp, clear message. This affliction is aggravated by overconfidence and a failure to prepare. To play off a Trump metaphor, you think you are a Big Leaguer, but perform like a Little Leaguer. 

Strategic communication requires discipline not only in what you say, but in what you don’t say. Only fools assume that the news media, especially in highly charged moments, won’t seize on inflammatory comments.  

In Trump’s case, he began walking himself into the airplane propeller by raising the red flag of a rigged election. While an audience applause line at his political rallies, his claim baited reporters to find the evidence of fraudulent electoral procedures. Since a majority of local and state election officials are Republicans, they could be expected to take offense at his claim, which they vigorously disputed.

Then comes the penultimate presidential debate and Trump, having already pushed himself out on the plank, appeared ill-prepared for the question he knows is coming as sure as flooding flows from major hurricanes. He could have answered the question about his acceptance of the presidential election outcome in a lot of ways, but he chose the one way that would command the airwaves and submerge his other messages. He tried to be cute.

Whether or not Trump’s tactic turns the election tide is irrelevant to what his comment did to his campaign and his surrogates. He and they will be forced for days to justify ambivalence about a deeply held political tradition of graceful losers and peaceful transitions of power. This probably isn’t what Trump intended, but a man with his business and celebrity background should have known what storm his comments would cause.

It’s worth recalling that  a former BP president, besieged by the controversy of one of the worst oil spills in history, wished out loud he could get some rest, as if his anguish was greater than the lives of people directly impacted by the oil spill. His wish came true sooner than expected, and perhaps not in the way he would have wished it.

Slips of the tongue can occur. But when stakes are high, you have to play the game at full capacity. That means preparation and discipline, not winging it and indulgence. Trump’s comment and its aftermath should be an object lesson on the mind of every executive who is asked to step into the limelight.

Gary Conkling is president and co-founder of CFM Strategic Communications, and he leads the firm's PR practice, specializing in crisis communications. He is a former journalist, who later worked on Capitol Hill and represented a major Oregon company. But most importantly, he’s a die-hard Ducks fan. You can reach Gary atgaryc@cfmpdx.com and you can follow him on Twitter at@GaryConkling.

Some Thoughts on Thought Leadership

In the Information Age, thought leaders have value. However, that value is only redeemable if a large enough group of people know your thoughts are worth paying attention to.

As Ryan O’Connell of Influence&CO. wrote, “Sometimes, it’s not what you know – it’s who else knows that you know what you know.” You know what he means.

Being recognized as a thought leader can be heady, motivating and profitable. But such recognition rarely just happens. It takes concentrated effort.

First, you have to have some thoughts worth sharing. Second, you have to find ways to share them so people see them.

Thoughts worth sharing

Thought leaders push boundaries. They tend to point out what’s on the horizon, not what’s in the rearview mirror. They provoke, inspire and challenge.

But there is a more mundane side to thought leadership that is just as valid. This kind of thought leader is a star at explaining what’s useful and relevant to his or her followers. Their skill is making something muddy seem clear.

A trait of thought leaders is a willingness to share. Their currency is information and they trade what they know to learn what you know. Like any good trader, they know the value of arbitrage and can combine what they know and you know into something a lot of other people want to know. Think of it as a form of assembling a thought worth knowing.

Thought leaders are learners. They aren’t satisfied with what they knew in the past or know now. They are driven to find out what they need to know tomorrow and the next day. Their quest is a GPS guide of thought leadership.

Content marketing campaigns center on useful and relevant information, which is the terroir of thought leaders. In fact, content marketing campaigns don’t really bear much fruit without thought leadership.

Thoughts that get shared

If thought leaders jotted down their provocative, useful and shareable thoughts only in their own journals, they wouldn’t be leaders regardless of how thoughtful they might be. Becoming a leader with something to say requires becoming a voice that is channeled so it is heard.

The digital world has made that much easier, and much harder. There are many platforms that thought leaders can use to publish or broadcast their big thoughts. Blogs, websites, YouTube channels, podcasts, ebooks, webinars and online forums are just some of the stages where thought leaders can perform. And that’s what makes the task harder. It is humanly impossible to be a thought leader everywhere at once.

So, the challenge of being heard isn’t how much you do, but where you do it. You need to project your thought leadership to places where your followers are listening or at least open to your thoughts. This can involve trial and error. You might think one channel leads to the promised land only to discover that other paths are more productive. It is best to try multiple channels, then concentrate on those with the best results and best alignment with your message.

As TED Talk speakers have shown, your message will resonate more if it is presented in an entertaining way. Thought leaders should give their listeners the equivalent of an irresistible and much appreciated hot cup of cocoa on a snowy day.

The ultimate goal of a thought leader is to emerge as an influencer. Thoughts are good. Thoughts that lead are great. As is the case for all forms of leadership, you aren’t a leader unless you have followers. You gain followers by giving them the incentive to follow – and with clear directions on how and where to follow.

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Gary Conkling is president and co-founder of CFM Strategic Communications, and he leads the firm's PR practice, specializing in crisis communications. He is a former journalist, who later worked on Capitol Hill and represented a major Oregon company. But most importantly, he’s a die-hard Ducks fan. You can reach Gary at garyc@cfmpdx.com and you can follow him on Twitter at@GaryConkling.

What Snap Spectacles Could See

Snap has a new name, business model and product – Snap Spectacles that the “camera company” is pitching as a toy, but could be a shrewd attempt to convince people of the value of being ready to shoot what they see when they see it.

Snap has a new name, business model and product – Snap Spectacles that the “camera company” is pitching as a toy, but could be a shrewd attempt to convince people of the value of being ready to shoot what they see when they see it.

The company that pioneered the disappearing video has introduced glasses to capture a fleeting moment.

Snap Spectacles carry a camera, but not hefty expectations. Snap, Inc (Snapchat’s new official name) calls Snap Spectacles a toy – and now calls itself a camera company.

There is clearly some serious intention in the play. Snap wants to make wearable cameras normal so when more eye-popping capability is perfected, this digital device will seem as normal as a selfie-stick.

As Google discovered a few years back, wearable cameras raised eyebrows over privacy concerns. But Snap Spectacles show up on the scene after selfies and quickie videos have become more pervasive and less scary and over-the-top eyewear has become more common and acceptable.

A pair of Snap Spectacles is relatively inexpensive. They don’t transport anyone into the virtual, augmented or altered reality space. You shoot what you see. It is real-time, first-person reality.

So why does anyone care about this latest electronic gadget? Marketers care because the accumulation of Snap Spectacles footage could show what people choose to see and shoot. This “through-their-eyes” perspective is hard to get or replicate and can be extremely valuable in establishing a buyer persona.

The cross-section of people with the self-confidence or trendsetting sense to don Snap Spectacles may be limited at first. But even that could be an advantage of scouring the videos  shot by what some might see as early adopters and influencers.

The spark that launched Snapchat, according to CEO Evan Spiegel, was to communicate “the full range of human emotion, not just a pretty picture.” Real-time Snapchat images weren't Photoshopped and didn’t linger in the cobwebs of social media. Snap Spectacles extends that principle to an even more personal viewpoint. It’s not what you stop and shoot; it’s what you see and shoot.

Snapchat is known for its clownish filters. Snap Spectacles could inspire clownish behavior to create special effects.

While there is continuing buzz about virtual reality goggles, Snap seems to be focused on a simpler formula – making it easier to record what you actually see as you see it. Getting people used to that could turn out to be as valuable as convincing people they could have a computer in their pocket. 

Podcasts Add Audio Storytelling Layers to Your Content

Podcasts are becoming increasingly popular and can add a new layer of audio storytelling to your content marketing mix

Podcasts are becoming increasingly popular and can add a new layer of audio storytelling to your content marketing mix

The concept of links and layers on websites has its analog in radio with podcasts. And one of the top practitioners is NPR, which hosts a majority of the most downloaded podcasts.

The rapid rise in popularity of podcasts affirms that people still like to listen to news, information and music, whether it’s on the radio, laptop or mobile device. It should be a reminder that podcasts offer a relatively inexpensive channel to deepen engagement with an audience, followers or customers.

Much like online newsrooms that serve as self-publishing platforms, podcasts act like your personal radio station. You get to decide the play list. Whether it’s you talking, customers describing how they use your product or guests who pass along useful information.

NPR’s approach to podcasts is instructive. It airs stories and offers podcasts to allow listeners to get into the topic in more depth. A good example is a new series hosted by Guy Raz that zeroes in on entrepreneurs. One of his first pieces centered on Cathy Hughes, an African-American woman who broke the sound barrier on radio and now owns an empire of 50 radio stations. Listeners got a taste of the story on air, but can hear the whole story on a podcast.

This technique of layering a story works at multiple levels. Many listeners will be satisfied with the shorter version of the story on air. Others will want more. The podcast becomes that more.

Ray sets a good example to follow. As the host and editorial director of the TED Talk Radio Hour, Raz has mastered the art of visual storytelling that is seductively entertaining and informative. His selection of speakers, use of visual assets and promotion on channels such as YouTube have given TED Talks broad exposure and a loyal audience. Now he is bringing those same elements to audio storytelling with the use of podcasts.

Foundation Digital has created an infographic tracing the rise of podcasting (almost 30 million hours produced annually), some of its most popular applications (music, comedy and news)  and the average length (22 minutes).  

From 2003 to 2016: The Astounding Growth of Podcasting [Infographic]

From 2003 to 2016: The Astounding Growth of Podcasting [Infographic]

As we’ve mention in a previous blog about the Freakonomics Radio podcast, this audio platform can be an excellent addition to a content marketing agenda. But it takes a little more effort than whipping out a tape recorder and starting to talk.

Like other forms of content marketing, you need to think about your audience and what will interest them that you can provide. Your content should align with your brand and be relevant to your brand promise. And it should be professional. Good sound quality, sharp editing and a script that pops along are necessary ingredients for podcasts to be downloaded and heard.

The equipment to produce podcasts has become much more accessible, just like video tools. You might need a little help to get started and find your groove. The good news that you don’t need a sound stage or production house to create your own informative and entertaining podcasts. (Don’t forget the entertainment part.)

Podcasts can be posted on websites, blogs and social media, giving your audience a chance to sample your product, service of advice before taking a deeper drink. If done right, yours is the voice someone will be listening to while sitting in congested traffic going to or coming home from work. It’s the next best thing to having a captive audience.

Crack a Joke to Build a Brand

Comedian Jim Gaffigan quips in a new commercial about driving a Chrysler Pacifica minivan and retaining his manhood. It’s just one example of how humor has become a staple of contemporary marketing campaigns, especially ones trying to appeal to young adults.

Comedian Jim Gaffigan quips in a new commercial about driving a Chrysler Pacifica minivan and retaining his manhood. It’s just one example of how humor has become a staple of contemporary marketing campaigns, especially ones trying to appeal to young adults.

No joke, comedy can be a brand builder.

Think of comedian Jim Gaffigan and his ads for the Chrysler Pacifica minivan, which are designed to convince young dads that driving a family minivan doesn’t mean you still can’t be cool and yourself.

Humor has become a regular staple in many marketing campaigns, especially ones aimed at younger audiences that are drawn to the sassy comedy of Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert and satirical commentary in The Onion

Peppercomm, a new York-based marketing company, has made humor a hallmark of its own culture. Its management and account leader training includes instruction in stand-up comedy. Co-founder and CEO Steve Cody said comedy was embedded in training “because it improved presentation, listening and rapport-building skills while creating a unique culture.”

“Many in the industry scoffed, believing PR was a far too serious business for comedy,” Cody added. “Today, we’re routinely hired by clients and non-clients to stage comedy workshops for their employees.” And the firm is retained to inject humor into client marketing campaigns.

Humor can be a double-edged sword. An insensitive joke or an offending aside can damage a brand or at least cause embarrassment. But well-timed comedy can be entertaining and even endearing.

Southwest Airlines is a great example. Flight attendants are well known for stand-up routines involving safety instructions. The iconoclastic airline has hired aspiring actors as flight attendants to help realize its corporate goal of making passengers laugh and feel at ease.

A Southwest Airlines attendant quipped as the plane was taking a long time to taxi to the runway, “You know, we drive halfway and fly the other half.” Another attendant deadpanned, “If you smoke on this airplane, the FAA will fine you $2,000. At those prices, you might as well fly Delta."

Even when humor is a corporate goal, discretion and a sense of timing are essential. Like any form of communication, and especially comedy, you have to know your audience. And your critics. Kmart took a risk with the “I Shipped My Pants” TV ad campaign. The play-on-words humor offended some, but it did help the struggling retailer dramatically drive up its web traffic. Before the ad, no one ever accused Kmart of being edgy.

Dollar Shave Club leapt into business with a YouTube video that was described as “unconventional, outrageous and blunt” – and, of course, funny. The video made the rounds of social media with more than 17 million views and put the startup company on the shaving map.

Charmin marketed toilet paper with a #tweetfromtheseat campaign that encouraged people to share their most innermost inspiration while on the throne in their bathroom.

State Farm peddled insurance with its “Jake from State Farm” ads that were reprised with Dan Aykroyd and Jane Curtin reprising their Conehead characters from Saturday Night Live. Not to be outdone, Allstate hired Dean Winters, who had a role in 30 Rock, to personify mayhem in a series of laugh-provoking commercials.

Wonderful Pistachios took no chances and hired Stephen Colbert to create buzz for its brand at the 2014 Super Bowl.

It is necessary to hire a production company, and it doesn't hurt to bring in a TV star, to convey a compellingly comedic side of your brand. Marketers who make humor part of messaging say the secret is in authenticity with a little showmanship. Getting a consumer to laugh is one of the best hooks to get them to buy.

Gary Conkling is president and co-founder of CFM Strategic Communications, and he leads the firm's PR practice, specializing in crisis communications. He is a former journalist, who later worked on Capitol Hill and represented a major Oregon company. But most importantly, he’s a die-hard Ducks fan. You can reach Gary at garyc@cfmpdx.com and you can follow him on Twitter at@GaryConkling.

Old Blogs with New Tricks

When your run dry of new ideas for your blog, thumb through your own portfolio of old blogs for fresh inspiration – and quite possibly a perfect repeat performance.

When your run dry of new ideas for your blog, thumb through your own portfolio of old blogs for fresh inspiration – and quite possibly a perfect repeat performance.

Old blog posts don’t have to be yesterday’s news. You can always repurpose evergreen content to publish as if it's something new.

Good blog content is timely and topical, which is what attracts clicks. But the advice contained in these blogs may live on and can form the basis for a new blog post or retrospective. In either case, the source for more material can certainly be your own old blog content.

Clever bloggers can think ahead and plan for a future use of their content, especially for that time when new ideas are are hard to come by or when an old blog suddenly becomes relevant all over again.

Another way to approach vintage blog content is to use it as a jumping off point for a new, related thought. Perhaps you’ve thought more about the advice you once gave and can expand on it. If have changed your mind on the subject, you can share the reasons why. Maybe you have more expertise or a new perspective now. 

Some subjects, like last year's food safety crisis at Chipotle, merit repeat coverage. You may have a product or a service with multiple aspects. You can write new blogs that highlight aspects you may have only briefly mentioned in previous blogs.

A new event might occasionally call for revisiting an old blog that was once more pertinent. Update it if you need to or re-post it if you don’t. Either way, make it clear you addressed the topic before – and your advice or service is still relevant.

A perfect trigger to resurrect archived blog content is in response to a customer question. Some may ask about a subject you’ve already covered, which gives you a chance to rework and update your thoughts in the form of an answer. You have the best of both worlds – responsiveness to a customer inquiry and credibility for having the answer already on the record.

Anticipating an emerging situation can be another terrific cause to revive an older blog that dealt with something similar. Think of your revived blog as a newsjacking opportunity.

Many content marketers and the organizations they serve complain about how hard it is to dream up material to write about. But maybe they should spend time thumbing through their own archives for new inspiration or old blogs that deserve another day in the sun.

You wouldn’t have to wonder where to look. Just pull up your own blog. Remember, old blogs can convey new tricks.

Gary Conkling is president and co-founder of CFM Strategic Communications, and he leads the firm's PR practice, specializing in crisis communications. He is a former journalist, who later worked on Capitol Hill and represented a major Oregon company. But most importantly, he’s a die-hard Ducks fan. You can reach Gary at garyc@cfmpdx.com and you can follow him on Twitter at @GaryConkling.

Rebranding Is Still Branding

There are lots of good reasons to rebrand, but throwing away your brand history isn’t one of them. Mr. Clean and its familiar jingle have been around since 1958 and have grown and evolved with the brand in step with the needs of their customers.

There are lots of good reasons to rebrand, but throwing away your brand history isn’t one of them. Mr. Clean and its familiar jingle have been around since 1958 and have grown and evolved with the brand in step with the needs of their customers.

There are many good reasons to launch a rebranding campaign – a new name, direction or product line. That said, though, rebranding shouldn’t abandon the original brand but instead move it to new ground with fresh expectations.

One of the worst outcomes of a rebranding campaign is to sacrifice the hard-earned capital of previous branding efforts. Even if a brand has some rust to shake off or a incurred a dent to smooth out, it still has residual value. Rebranding isn’t about starting over; it’s about refreshing (and fixing) what has been.

After a string of food safety issues, Chipotle received lots of advice about its brand. Some argued the company should scrap the name and start over. Others said the Mexican fast casual chain should retain its name and undertake a rebranding campaign that underlined why people like Chipotle's food and how the company has responded to its food safety crisis.

Like branding, rebranding is all about positioning. What makes your product or service distinct? What is your value proposition? Why should anybody care about what you offer?

Rebranding affords a chance to tell the world who you are in a fresh way, whether it’s updating your product or service line, using new tools such as video to tell your story or placing your story in new channels where customers hang out and pay attention.

Rebranding allows companies to respond to their customers' changes in taste. Think of all the food ads you now see that talk about being gluten free or produced without growth hormones.

Stodgy brands turn to rebranding to inject a youthful step into their offerings. You can still enjoy venerable Campbell’s chicken noodle soup, and now you can take it to work in a handy cup that heats up in a microwave.

One off the best uses of rebranding is to move from pushing a message to attracting viewers through informative, relevant and useful content. This can mean rethinking a website to relying on digital media promotion. A website makeover can evolve from what is essentially and electronic brochure to an information hub designed around how existing and potential customers or clients interact with a product or service. Moving to digital media could be as basic as relying less on the phone book and more on self-publishing content of value to customers or clients.

If, like Chipotle, a company is rebranding to move on from the past, then rebranding has to deal openly and honestly with the past. That honesty conveys its own freshness that customers often will reward. This requires more than lip service to change. Show the change with video and validate its value with credible third parties.

Rebranding is not a brand divorce. It is more like a brand family extension. The all-purpose Mr. Clean was introduced in 1958 with its own character and jingle that helped propel the product, originally developed to swab out ocean-going ships, into a best-selling customer favorite.

In 2016, after the Mr. Clean product line had expanded into a full line of cleaning products, including the Magic Eraser, the character and jingle were modernized. You could still recognize the spiffed-up Mr. Clean and the jingle struck a familiar chord. Instead of mentioning white sidewall tires and old golf balls, the jingle talked about using Mr. Clean to “clean your whole house and everything that’s in it.”

The rebranding has been an unquestionable success. And the jingle is the longest running advertising tune in television history.

Dancing with Truth and Consequences

U.S. Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte wants to move on from his fractured hold-up story in Rio to ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars” without dancing with the consequences of his cover-up lie.

U.S. Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte wants to move on from his fractured hold-up story in Rio to ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars” without dancing with the consequences of his cover-up lie.

The brand known as Ryan Lochte is broken. An apology isn’t enough to glue the legs back on his brand.

In another televised interview, Lochte admitted to lying about an armed hold-up at a Rio de Janeiro gas station that he and three other U.S. Olympic swimmers apparently vandalized when drunk. Apologies work when someone makes a mistake and owns it. They don’t settle the score when you make a mistake and try to cover it up.

For reasons that are hard to understand, Lochte continues to use the odd phrase “over-exaggerated” the truth. He didn’t exaggerate the truth. He lied.

Lochte blames the news media for fanning the flames and dragging out the story. He says, “I have a great team. They are dealing with it, all the legal issues. We’re just trying to get this over with. It’s been dragged out way too long. The media has taken this to a whole new level. I want to put this behind me and move on and move forward.”

Lochte adds, “There are other, bigger issues that this world is facing. I am human. I made a mistake, and that’s something I am going to have to live with.”

Yes, the world has bigger problems than Lochte. And, yes, he will have to live with his mistake. But if he wants his brand to shine again, he needs to redeem himself, less for the deed, than the cover-up and his continued whining.

Lochte already is pitching for his appearance on “Dancing With the Stars,” which appears on ABC, the same network that carries Good Morning America, where Lochte made his latest attempt at a cleansing apology.

If Lochte really wants redemption and to show he has a spine, not just swim fins, he might consider returning to Rio to face the criminal charges that have been filed against him. Would it be risky and could he face actual jail time? You bet. It would also show he is a grown up prepared to accept the consequences of his actions. Maybe he could agree to community service, working with young Brazilians who want to become world-class swimmers, but wouldn’t have an opportunity to learn from a world-class swimmer.

Showing respect for Brazil, its people and its laws would make Lochte respectable again as a brand. His actions would speak louder than his poor choice of words and his pathetic attempt to deflect blame for his misery on the media.

Acting like an adult might be inconvenient for Lochte. It might force him to miss his dance date on a TV show. That’s the price you have to pay for bad behavior. It's also the price you have to pay to redeem your brand, and perhaps even your own self-respect.

Gary Conkling is president and co-founder of CFM Strategic Communications, and he leads the firm's PR practice, specializing in crisis communications. He is a former journalist, who later worked on Capitol Hill and represented a major Oregon company. But most importantly, he’s a die-hard Ducks fan. You can reach Gary at garyc@cfmpdx.com and you can follow him on Twitter at @GaryConkling.

Surprising Impact of Surprise and Delight Marketing

Apple’s use of Maya Angelou’s “Human Family” poem in a TV ad to mark the opening of the 2016 Rio Olympics is an example of how to capture attention through the use of surprise and delight in marketing.

Apple’s use of Maya Angelou’s “Human Family” poem in a TV ad to mark the opening of the 2016 Rio Olympics is an example of how to capture attention through the use of surprise and delight in marketing.

Poetry plays a paltry role in advertising. So when a great poem features in an ad, it has a huge impact.

Apple is airing a 60-second TV spot with the late Maya Angelou reading her Human Family over a series of engrossing photos of people from around the world shot on iPhones. The ad debuted during the opening ceremony of the 2016 Rio Olympics, positioning Apple as an essential part of the human family.

Poems don’t work because of rhymes or clever cadence. They work because they are surprise content. They are so different than the norm, they captivate attention. If the poem or surprise content is good, the listeners keep listening and watching.

People like surprises. Studies prove it. And as much as advertisers obsess over the numbers of impressions an ad gets, a well-timed surprise can have as much or more impact.

The element of surprise doesn’t have to be of the jumping-out-of-the-cake variety. It can just be different or out of ordinary, like a poem.

Often, visual effects can surprise and delight an audience. Wieden + Kennedy’s ongoing series of ads for Old Spice relied on surprise elements from Terry Crews impersonating beard stubble to Mr. Wolfdog as director of marketing to Isaiah Mustafa on the beach showing how to smell like a man. The ads mostly appeared on Old Spice’s YouTube Channel, racking up nearly 100 million views. Instead of young adults bypassing commercials, they couldn’t wait to see and share these ads.

Surprise announcements can have an impact. MasterCard has a “Priceless Surprises” campaign that involves giving its  followers on social media gifts and prizes, such as a meet-up with Justin Timberlake or VIP tickets to the Grammy Awards. The campaign turned into an app that brings the credit card company even closer to its users through the use of surprise. The campaign and the app have resulted in greater brand loyalty and a barrage of positive online comments.

Apple, Old Spice and MasterCard can afford top-flight creative talent to produce surprising content and campaigns. So it’s important to note that surprise and delight doesn’t have to be a high-priced option. The auto mechanic who sends a thank you note, the vendor who unquestionably replaces a product and the sales rep who places a follow-up call to make you you successfully assembled a piece of furniture are examples of surprise and delight marketing.

The heart of surprise and delight marketing is making an emotional connection that instills loyalty. Kleenex took note that many of the status updates by its Facebook followers said they were sick. The company tracked down the actual addresses of 50 customers with colds and sent them a get-well basket of Kleenex products. Most of the surprised recipients took selfies with their surprise gifts and posted them on Facebook, attracting thousands of views.

The Apple commercial featuring an excerpt from Angelou’s well known poem was beautifully produced and deeply affecting. But in the end the ad was just a poem and photos taken on iPhones. Surprising people is less about money than imagination.

Human Family
I note the obvious differences
in the human family.
Some of us are serious,
some thrive on comedy.
Some declare their lives are lived
as true profundity,
and others claim they really live
the real reality.
The variety of our skin tones
can confuse, bemuse, delight,
brown and pink and beige and purple,
tan and blue and white.
I've sailed upon the seven seas
and stopped in every land,
I've seen the wonders of the world
not yet one common man.
I know ten thousand women
called Jane and Mary Jane,
but I've not seen any two
who really were the same.
Mirror twins are different
although their features jibe,
and lovers think quite different thoughts
while lying side by side.
We love and lose in China,
we weep on England's moors,
and laugh and moan in Guinea,
and thrive on Spanish shores.
We seek success in Finland,
are born and die in Maine.
In minor ways we differ,
in major we're the same.
I note the obvious differences
between each sort and type,
but we are more alike, my friends,
than we are unalike.
We are more alike, my friends,
than we are unalike.
We are more alike, my friends,
than we are unalike.

Don’t Be Put Off by the Term. Newsjacking Works.

Newsjacking is a way to ride the crest of breaking news or a popular event to tell your story and gain valuable exposure that would be virtually impossible any other way. And mostly for free.

Newsjacking is a way to ride the crest of breaking news or a popular event to tell your story and gain valuable exposure that would be virtually impossible any other way. And mostly for free.

“Newsjacking is the art and science of injecting your ideas into a breaking news story so you and your ideas get noticed.”

David Meerman Scott hijacked this term to describe a new type of media relations that hops aboard a trending story or topic instead of trying to launch a story from a cold start. Not everyone in the public relations world thinks newsjacking is a great term or idea.

“As a public relations executive with more than 20 years of experience and a track record for creatively connecting clients to top-tier media opportunities, I was initially amused by the mashup ‘newsjacking’ – but only for about 30 seconds,” writes Tracey Boudine, vice president of Wise Public Relations. “Who wants to position themselves as an expert on hijacking news?”

Seen as a form of hijacking, the concept isn’t all that attractive. But that’s not really Scott’s point. In explaining his view on newsjacking, Scott says:

“When there is news in your marketplace, reporters and analysts are looking for experts to comment on the story. Newsjacking gets you media attention. With little effort.

"As a story develops in real-time, buyers become interested in products and services based on what’s happening now. Newsjacking generates sales leads and adds new customers. For free.”

One of the most appealing elements of newsjacking is that anyone who is plugged in can do it. “Newsjacking is being used right now by nonprofits, political campaigns, business-to-business marketers and individuals,” Scott says.

Since a lot of newsjacking involves social media, the cost is minimal. The premium isn’t on how much money you have in the budget, but on how much imagination you have in the brain. “News gathering happens in real time, and it can encompass anyone who steps forward quickly with credible input,” Scott says.

Boudin takes issue with calling Oreo’s Super Bowl tweet about dunking in the dark an example of newsjacking. She says the trending tweet is better described as “real-time, social media marketing.” But that’s semantics. “News” isn’t restricted to what’s covered by newspapers or TV stations.

In an amusing recent segment, Tonight Show host Jimmy Fallon noted that more people now get their news from Facebook than any other source. Then he provided some Facebook “news” examples: “Nobody Knows When to Unfriend a Dead Co-Worker” and “Wall Post Discussion About Pumpkin Spice Latte Still Ends Up About Obama.”

Those are fake headlines, but you get the point. News is what people make it. Newsjacking is just a tactic to surf on whatever news wave is sweeping by your target audience.

Don’t crinkle your nose over the term newsjacking. The concept works. Here is a great example from my PR colleague, Dan Keeney:

The Society for Heart Attack Prevention & Eradication (SHAPE) was frustrated by the slow adoption rate of its techniques to identify people at risk of an imminent heart attack. In the hours after former President Bill Clinton’s heart attack scare, Keeney coined the term “The Clinton Syndrome” and used it as an example of how SHAPE’s assessment process works to save lives. Keeney’s rapid response earned quality media coverage in major print and electronic media across the nation, including a cover story in TIME magazine. The exposure SHAPE gained from Keeney’s newsjacking of the Clinton heart attack scare created grassroots pressure and eventually led the American Heart Association to adopt guidelines based on SHAPE’s recommendations.

If you haven’t added newsjacking to your media relations arsenal, you are missing opportunities that literally are at your fingertips.

Gary Conkling is president and co-founder of CFM Strategic Communications, and he leads the firm's PR practice, specializing in crisis communications. He is a former journalist, who later worked on Capitol Hill and represented a major Oregon company. But most importantly, he’s a die-hard Ducks fan. You can reach Gary at garyc@cfmpdx.com and you can follow him on Twitter at @GaryConkling.

Brand Stories Where Brand and Story Are Inseparable

The best brand stories are ones where the brand and the story are inseparable, like GoldieBlox, which makes construction toys for young girls to spark their interest in eventually becoming engineers.

The best brand stories are ones where the brand and the story are inseparable, like GoldieBlox, which makes construction toys for young girls to spark their interest in eventually becoming engineers.

Storytelling is in. Brand stories and storytelling are the vehicles of choice for content marketing. But not all stories are created equal.

One of the better brand stories is by GoldieBlox, which was launched in 2012 as a way to "introduce girls to  the joy of engineering at a young age.” Founder Debbie Sterling earned a degree in mechanical engineering and was struck by how few women studied to become engineers.

“Construction toys develop an early interest in science, technology, engineering and math,” the GoldieBlox website says. “But for over a hundred years, they’ve been considered boys toys. GoldieBlox is determined to change the equation. We aim to disrupt the pink aisle and inspire the future generation of female engineers.”

The young company, which went from Kickstarter funding to a $1 million in orders in six weeks, features BloxTown on its website. This is a storytelling showplace. There are videos, apps, toys and “The Gang” – four young multiracial women who personify the goals of GoldieBlox. There is Goldie Blox (mechanical engineer and Ms. fixit), Ruby Rails (software engineer and dressmaker), Li Gravity (daredevil who calculates the physics of her stunts) and Valentina Voltz (gadget lover and musician). They even have their own compatible pets, like Nacho, Goldie’s basset hound sidekick who “eats, farts and drools.”

Products are placed on the web page as just another avenue to adventure.

GoldieBlox has a blog with frequently updated content, typically featuring women engineers and technologists, who are called #goldmodels. The blog invites stories from women with careers in scientific and engineering fields (“Engineers in the Wild”), as well as from young girls whose interest in those professions has been piqued.

GoldieBlox is an excellent example of a brand built around and fueled by a story. The story and the brand are inseparable. The GoldieBlox brand story works for several reasons:

  • The story about the brand is authentic
  • The story has human appeal
  • The product and the brand story are closely linked
  • There is a clear call to action.

Too many brand stories are forced or superficial. They come closer to brand hype than a brand story.

Like any other good story, a brand story needs to resonate with its audience, to touch as many of their senses as possible so people feel transported to where the story takes place. That place can be as close as the family living room where a young girl constructs her first whirligig.

Portland’s Iconic Pitchman and Beloved Showman

Tom Peterson’s trademark flat-top image was everywhere in Portland – on alarm clocks, wristwatches and coffee mugs. And Tom Peterson was a constant presence on TV, inviting people to come to his “happy place to buy."

Tom Peterson’s trademark flat-top image was everywhere in Portland – on alarm clocks, wristwatches and coffee mugs. And Tom Peterson was a constant presence on TV, inviting people to come to his “happy place to buy."

Tom Peterson is easily the most recognizable pitchman for his own Portland brand of retail appliance, furniture and electronics stores. While his branding style may have seemed corny, it worked.

Peterson, who died last month at 86, was instantly recognizable because of his trademark flat-top haircut, his homemade TV ads and his favorite, highly inflected catch phrase, "FREE is a very good price.”

Peterson was more than just a pitchman, though. You could call him a true showman. He lived his brand, often greeting customers on his showroom floor with a friendly handshake as well as talking to them via his TV ads. He didn’t high-hat people. He knew his customers were typical working class Oregonians who wanted a value from someone they trusted.

Peterson was very engaging in person. Taller than he seemed on television, Peterson was anything but a self-absorbed celebrity. He was down to earth, even when he was TOM Peterson, the TV personality beckoning you to come to “the happy place to buy.”

Peterson’s legacy is that brands need to be personal. In today’s world, that means finding a way to engage customers. In Peterson’s heyday, it meant being the face of a brand that was as familiar to customers as cloudy days in Portland. People woke up to alarm clocks with Tom Peterson’s face, they wore his wristwatches and they drank morning coffee from mugs with his and his wife Gloria’s picture that marked the couple’s 50th anniversary.

You never were at a loss to know what Peterson was saying, but he didn’t shout. He used schtick to get and stay noticed. One of his gimmicks was “Wake up” ads that touted his stores staying open from 11 p.m. to 3 a.m. to serve insomniacs and the curious.

Peterson was best man at a wedding officiated by beloved local professional wrestler Rowdy Roddy Piper. He gave away Halloween masks in his image, which he printed in black and white in case anyone would try to use one while robbing a bank. He offered free flat-top haircuts in his stores. His iconic face appeared in comic books and stencil art. There was even a song written about him called “I Woke Up with a Tom Peterson Haircut."

Anyone around Portland in the 1970s  and 1980s knew the sound of “It’s TOM Peterson.” He was known more broadly, too. Northwest native Kurt Cobain wore his kitschy wristwatch. Director Gus Van Sant, who lives in Portland, cast Peterson in three cameo roles in his films Drugstore Cowboy, My Private Idaho and To Die For. Peterson also appeared in Mr. Holland’s Opus, which was filmed in Portland.

It’s a bit surprising that Peterson was never asked to play a starring role in Portlandia. The truth is, Peterson wasn’t viewed as a peculiarity. He was a Portland icon.

A victim of overreach and overwhelming debt, Peterson filed for bankruptcy in 1991. At his wife’s suggestion, Peterson talked candidly about his financial pickle on his TV ads as he was reduced to working on the sales floor to clear inventory.

Ever the optimist, Peterson became a motivational speaker and he and his wife emerged from bankruptcy to start a similar business in 1992 on a smaller scale, but with the same personality-forward brand – Tom Peterson's and Gloria's, Too! Tellingly, the sale of Tom Peterson memorabilia helped raise funds for their new venture.

Les Schwab, Orville Roth and Fred Meyer were the faces and often the voices of their brands. They were also the personification of their brands, the person customers trusted – Schwab with his tire guarantee, Roth with his signature green tie walking the aisles of his grocery stores and Meyer promoting one-stop shopping.

No one, however, has quite reached the iconic status of Peterson in Portland. Perhaps because no one thought about branding the way he did. When asked why he put his image on and his voice in an alarm clock that he gave away, Peterson said, “If you can put your face in 5,000 Portland homes, it certainly can’t hurt.”

Apparently not. Even the attorney for Peterson’s creditors in his bankruptcy case wore a Tom Peterson wristwatch.

YouTube Channels that Inform, Entertain and Humanize

Michelle Phan went from a makeup blogger to a YouTube phenom by combining her visual subject matter with a medium that matched her target audience’s preference and offering informative, entertaining and humanized video content.

Michelle Phan went from a makeup blogger to a YouTube phenom by combining her visual subject matter with a medium that matched her target audience’s preference and offering informative, entertaining and humanized video content.

People love to watch videos for information and entertainment. One way to capitalize on this popularity is to broadcast your videos on your own YouTube channel.

Socialblade.com has listed the top 100 YouTube channels, which confirms people, especially young ones, like to watch videos that are informative and entertaining. Many of the top 100 are YouTube channels for performing artists, such as Justin Bieber and Beyoncé. And then there is Michelle Phan.

Phan took a blog devoted to makeup tutorials and turned it into a YouTube powerhouse. She has uploaded almost 400 videos since 2007, which have attracted more than 1 billion views. One of Phan’s most viewed videos – 1.5 million views – shows how to style up when attending a music festival.

Other videos talk about hair removal, pimples and makeup tips and tricks. Phan provides trend reports on metallic lips, lift-up shoes, peel-off makeup and glitter freckles. There also are videos that address cyberbullying and acne shaming.

Phan, who was born in Massachusetts, posted a video earlier this year about her trip to Vietnam to meet with family members and discover her ancestral roots. The video is polished, with professional videography and quick clips that take you along for her ride without making you wish you could jump off the bus.

Michelle Phan went from a blogger to a YouTube powerhouse vlogger by using the visual strength of videos to bring her makeup tutorials to life.

Michelle Phan went from a blogger to a YouTube powerhouse vlogger by using the visual strength of videos to bring her makeup tutorials to life.

Phan is regarded as a YouTube personality and entrepreneur. But her secret isn’t really a secret. She took a subject that is highly visual and brought it to life on video. She mastered an on-camera style that makes a potentially boring subject interesting, or even exciting for young women intensely consumed with how they look.

Marketers encourage use of video content because it can boost clicks on social media and websites. Some recommend setting up YouTube channels to create your own broadcasting network to run parallel with a website. We agree with the power of videos, especially as more people interact with the internet on mobile devices.

But more is required than setting up a camera to capture a talking head or an unstaged and unscripted event. Videos worth watching are videos that have been designed with forethought. For example, Phan succeeds on YouTube because her message and her medium match with the preferences of her target audience.

AARP has a YouTube channel that features videos with clips of 1960s rock and roll bands, tips on how to avoid injuring-causing falls and look-backs to major historical events. The YouTube channel for Angie’s List contains videos showing to stain a deck, finding the best body shop after a wreck and deciding whether to repair or replace an air conditioner.

AARP provides a suite of video content on its YouTube channel designed to address issues of interest to older Americans, including an avenue for entrepreneurs to pitch ideas to help seniors maintain an independent lifestyle.

AARP provides a suite of video content on its YouTube channel designed to address issues of interest to older Americans, including an avenue for entrepreneurs to pitch ideas to help seniors maintain an independent lifestyle.

Video provides an opportunity to humanize your brand, infusing it with personality, a life story and first-hand experience. YouTube is a perfect channel to extend your story brand and engage customers. The key is to make your brand extension and customer engagement informative and entertaining so people tune in.

Avoid Killing Your Audience with Deadly Speaking Habits

Great speakers don’t kill their audiences. They build rapport, start strong, follow a clear path and finish with a pop. They don’t make lame jokes, read their slides verbatim or avoid looking their audience in the eye.

Great speakers don’t kill their audiences. They build rapport, start strong, follow a clear path and finish with a pop. They don’t make lame jokes, read their slides verbatim or avoid looking their audience in the eye.

You can spiff up your presentation skills. Start by taking the advice of an accounting intern. Seriously, take his advice.

Jeff Chappell, an accounting analyst intern at Dell, bases his recommendations for better presentations on experience. The experience of watching many awkward, emotionless and ineffective presentations. There is no better experience than that.

He identifies seven deadly presentation habits you need to shed to avoid putting your audience to sleep:

  • Treating a presentation as a teleprompter and reading each slide word for word, unless you're a pro script reader, like Jimmy Fallon.
  • Telling the audience you’re nervous or a bad public speaker.
  • Starting with a joke, which can often fall flat.
  • Zooming through the presentation like a race car driver seeing how fast he can finish.
  • Sticking with your script even when you see audience members squirming or checking their smartphones.
  • Maintaining weak or no eye contact with your audience.
  • Closing meekly.

None of these suggestions is revolutionary. Taken together, they represent pretty solid advice.

A boring presentation can leave you wishing you'd spent your time elsewhere. That's why it's critical to avoid bad presentation habits, which Jeff Chappell laid out this month on LinkedIn. 

A boring presentation can leave you wishing you'd spent your time elsewhere. That's why it's critical to avoid bad presentation habits, which Jeff Chappell laid out this month on LinkedIn. 

Think about dreadful presentations you have endured when speakers got off to a lame start, droned on and ended with a poof instead of a pop. What you remember was how bad the presentation was, not what the presentation was about. At best, you may have contemplated in your mind what the presentation could have been – informative, inspiring, interesting.

Chappell’s recommendations came in a blog he posted on LinkedIn. He attributed some of his suggestions to lessons he learned in a presentation skills class taught at Dell. Chappell said he wrote the blog because “the cost of having one of the seven deadly habits of public speaking is too high to be ignored.” And the price to correct these deadly habits is relatively inexpensive. “Practice,” he says, is the difference.

“It doesn’t matter if you practice on the phone, in the shower or in front of friends, just practice correctly,” Chappell advises. “After a few sessions of practice, you’ll be wowing the audience with your confidence and professionalism.” It takes more than that, but you would definitely be on the right track.

Great speakers start by establishing a rapport with their audience, then making a compelling introduction of their speech topic. They give the audience a map of where the speech will go, then walk them through key points. They build momentum and anticipation as they go along, then end with a powerful crescendo. They use body language to help tell the story.

Not all great speakers use presentations, but when they do, their presentations are graphically-based reminders of key points in the speech. The presentation reinforces the message rather than distracting the speaker or the audience.

You might call these the heavenly habits of great speakers, which will lift you up in the eyes of your audience and send them home with positive thoughts, clear impressions and indelible messages.