Good Jobs Nation Tour Elevates Economic Issues

A labor-backed tour started this week that seeks to put pressure on the Trump administration to keep its campaign promises on jobs, but also may signal a move by Democrats to focus on bread-and-butter issues heading into mid-term elections next year.

A labor-backed tour started this week that seeks to put pressure on the Trump administration to keep its campaign promises on jobs, but also may signal a move by Democrats to focus on bread-and-butter issues heading into mid-term elections next year.

Potential Russian election collusion, failed repeal and replacement of Obamacare and a tone-deaf response to violence in Charlottesville has eroded, but didn’t eviscerate President Trump’s hard-core political support. The Good Jobs Nation tour that began this week could pose a more serious political threat.

The two-week tour is designed to put pressure on Trump to live up to his campaign promises on jobs.

“Trump ran as a working-class hero, so let’s look at the results,” Joseph Geevarghese, executive director of Good Jobs Nation, told The Washington Post. “We’re seven months into his administration and wages are flat. People are still getting pink slips.”

The tour pointedly started in Indiana, home of the Carrier plant that starred in the Trump campaign and the early Trump presidency when he announced a deal with company management to keep manufacturing jobs in the United States instead of shifting them to Mexico in return for $700,000 per year in state tax breaks. Labor leaders say Carrier is laying off workers and moving manufacturing to Mexico despite the deal Trump negotiated.

“He made promises to working-class people,” said Chuck Jones, who represented steelworkers at the Carrier plant. “He said if he were president, jobs would not be leaving this country. Guess what? They still are. He could be signing executive orders. He’s not lifting a finger.”

Organized labor is also irked at Trump for turning his back on an Obama-era rule on overtime and a regulation requiring companies bidding on government projects to disclose labor law violations because business groups opposed them. The Communications Workers of America is upset because the Trump administration has failed to respond to its request for an executive order relating to US-based call centers.

Ironically, Trump has defended his record in office by pointing to an uptick on the stock market, continued steady job growth and a slight increase in wages – indicators Trump the candidate scorned as not reflecting the true economic condition staring at many American workers.

Souring relations with blue-collar workers is not a good political sign for Trump or Republicans generally. Those workers provided the marginal votes that enabled Trump in 2016 to carry traditionally Democratic states such as Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania and give him an electoral college victory.

The analytics of congressional districts don’t look all that promising for Democrats heading into the 2018 mid-term elections, which means they will need to bear down on economic issues to erode GOP electoral advantages.

The analytics of congressional districts don’t look all that promising for Democrats heading into the 2018 mid-term elections, which means they will need to bear down on economic issues to erode GOP electoral advantages.

The tour doesn’t overlook that fact. One of the stops is in Wisconsin, which will feature Randy Bryce, a labor organizer who is challenging House Speaker Paul Ryan in his re-election bid next year. Wisconsin is where Taiwan-based Foxconn has announced plans to build a plant to make components for the iPhone in exchange for $3 billion in subsidies, a deal that organized labor is opposing.

Trump, GOP leaders and business groups are likely to dismiss the Good Jobs Nation tour as a political ploy by organized labor and leftist Democrats, noting the kickoff speaker in Indianapolis is Senator Bernie Sanders. While the tour itself may not strike a decisive blow to the Trump presidency, it will elevate questions about Trump’s economic plans and his inability, at least so far, to move forward an economic agenda that includes tax cuts and infrastructure investment. Whether Democrats can take advantage is an open question.

Blue and Red State analytics aren’t all that encouraging for a major Democratic comeback in the 2018 mid-term election. But polls do indicate that the issue Trump supporters watch closely is boosting the economy and spreading the benefits to include people who feel left behind economically.

In the words of former White House adviser Steve Bannon, “The longer they [Democrats] talk about identity politics, I got ’em. I want them to talk about racism every day. If the left is focused on race and identity, and we go with economic nationalism, we can crush the Democrats.”

It will be worth tracking whether the Good Jobs Nation tour reveals a crack in Trump’s blue-collar support or signals a new emphasis by Democrats on bread-and-butter issues.