Fiskum Confirmed on the Oregon Government Ethics Commission

Retired CFM co-founder and partner Dave Fiskum was confirmed today by the Oregon Senate for the 9-member Oregon Government Ethics Commission. Fiskum was nominated by Governor Brown. He will take his seat at the next OGEC meeting June 2.

In testimony at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Rules Committee, Fiskum said, “Ethics is a matter of personal commitment and behavior. It’s who you are and what you do. Nothing more. Nothing less.”

In his 15-year career working for state government, followed by 23 years as a state lobbyist, Fiskum was widely regarded inside and outside the Capitol for his integrity. 

Dave Fiskum, pictured with many of his CFM colleagues, was roasted by friends and colleagues following his retirement. He had to be tricked into attending his own event by the promise of playing a round of golf with his buddies.

Dave Fiskum, pictured with many of his CFM colleagues, was roasted by friends and colleagues following his retirement. He had to be tricked into attending his own event by the promise of playing a round of golf with his buddies.

The OGEC was established in 1974 by a vote of the people in Oregon in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal that ultimately forced President Nixon to resign. The Commission enforces laws dealing with state government ethics and executive sessions, as well as oversees lobbyist registration and financial disclosure.

Members of the OGEC may not be registered as a lobbyist. Fiskum retired from an active role in CFM two years ago. He also is registered as an unaffiliated Oregon voter.

Fiskum graduated from Seattle Pacific University, began his career as a reporter for The Daily Astorian and worked in Washington, DC for former Oregon Congressman Les AuCoin. His state work included higher education, corrections, human services and economic development. Fiskum worked for both Republican and Democratic administrations.

As a state lobbyist for CFM clients, Fiskum handled health care, human services and port issues, among others. He also was the firm’s Ways and Means go-to guy.

Fiskum and his wife, Nancy, live in Salem.