Video Centerpiece of Virtual Open House

CFM has created a video for the Portland Water Bureau, which is dismantling a pipeline bridge (left span) and moving it, as part of the Sandy River Crossing project.

Moving one of Oregon’s oldest bridges for reuse. Protecting Portland’s drinking water. A bold move to build a tunnel under the Sandy River. All good stories featured in a YouTube video prepared for the Portland Water Bureau (PWB) by CFM.

CFM has created a video for the Portland Water Bureau, which is dismantling a pipeline bridge (left span) and moving it, as part of the Sandy River Crossing project. The goal was to help PWB and Kiewit Pacific Co. communicate the next big steps for the Sandy River Crossing (SRX) Tunnel Conduit Relocation Project. SRX is entering a major new phase in May. Rather than hold a traditional project update open house, the SRX team launched a virtual open house featuring a four-minute video.

SRX relocates the exposed sections of two of the City of Portland's water supply conduits into a 435-foot tunnel under the river. Conduits #2 and #4 currently cross the river via a 115-year-old pipeline bridge near Dodge Park. But not for long. 

With final installation of two huge drinking water conduits in the new tunnel under the river, water from the Bull Run reserve will start flowing through the new system in May. That means the old pipelines and bridge next to the Lusted Road auto crossing will be removed. And, removal will require some temporary closures of the river to recreational boaters this summer.

With a limited budget, CFM took on the challenge of doing the video in-house, not using third-party subcontractors as it usually does. “We did not have the best quality video gear and we had to carefully manage our time, but we had some great visual resources,” says Doug Babb, who provides communications support on SRX for Kiewit and the water bureau.

The relocation project is vitally important, says Tim Collins, Portland Water Bureau: “This project is an aggressive project. It will accomplish some good goals of further securing and reducing the vulnerability to 800,000 people – nearly a quarter of the population of the state of Oregon.

Click here to watch the video